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Keyboard Types

This is an exhaustive overview of the known major Model F, Model M and ThinkPad family keyboard variants. Note that many of these are not official designations - these are based on enthusiast categorisation to help distinct them apart by word.

79 keyboard types listed...

Model F 5322 Desktop Keyboard "Bezelmaster"

Variant of a Model F 5322 Desktop Keyboard

Shorthand: F Datamaster

The Model F Datamaster Desktop Keyboard was the first buckling springs keyboard released by IBM and is in fact an integrated assembly inside the IBM 5322 System/23 Datamaster computer. Released in July 1981, the general layout and physical assembly would be reused only a month later for the IBM 5150 Personal Computer as the Model F/XT. Whilst rare and its host computer very expensive, this keyboard has the honour of being the first of a very successful line of keyboards.

Model F 5324 Floortop Keyboard "Bezelmaster"

Shorthand: F Datamaster

Model F/XT PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/XT PC Keyboard

Shorthand: F/XT

Form factor: Navblockless

The IBM Personal Computer Keyboard was the first individually distinct and most common Model F keyboard. Debuting with the IBM 5150 Personal Computer (the original IBM PC) in August 1981 and later featured with the IBM 5160 Personal Computer XT (that gave it its common nickname), this keyboard played an important role in establishing the PC as a high-quality computer and solidifying buckling springs-based keyboards as IBM's go-to for well over a decade after its release. Relative the competition, the Model F/XT brought unsurpassed reliability and build quality to the mix but arguably suffered from a layout too different from others.

Model F-based Typewriter Keyboard Assembly

Shorthand: F Typewriter

Capacitive buckling springs assemblies were briefly featured with the IBM Electronic Typewriter Models 65, 85 and 95 from 1982 as an intermediary step between the older mechanical Selectric typewriter family and Model M-based Wheelwriter family. They are also amongst the smallest Model Fs made.

Model F 6580 Displaywriter Type B Keyboard

Variant of a Model F 6580 Displaywriter Type B Keyboard

The IBM Displaywriter Type B Keyboard was the low-profile and ergonomic replacement for the beam spring-based Type A keyboard for the IBM 6580 Displaywriter System word processor made available some time in 1982. Featuring the same layout as its predecessor, the Type B features an early complete ISO-like alphanumeric block that would later be used by the IBM Functional Key Keyboard series and ISO-based IBM Enhanced Keyboards.

Model F 5291 Terminal Keyboard "Bigfoot"

Variant of a Model F 5291 Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: F Bigfoot

Form factor: Navblockless

The so-called "bigfoot" Model F terminal keyboard was a detached variant of the Model F keyboard assembly found inside the IBM 5322 System/23 made especially for the IBM 5291 Display Station and features the IBM 5251 Display Station's beam spring keyboard layout. Looking like an enlarged Model F/XT, the keyboard features extremely enlarged bezels acting as a sort of palm rest and comes with three-setting adjustable feet larger than any other feet found on IBM keyboards.

Model F 4704 Model 100 Functional Keypad "F50"

Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 100 Functional Keypad

Shorthand: F50

Form factor: 50% matrix

The IBM Model 100 was the first and smallest keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal introduced in October 1982 and is the second smallest known Model F assembly. Usually featuring 45 transparent keys and 5 hard-set function keys, the Model 100 acted as a sort of macro pad for the system by allowing the user to map functions to those 45 transparent keys and put custom labels underneath them.

Model F 4704 Model 200 Alphameric Keyboard "Kishsaver"

Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 200 Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 200 Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 200 Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 200 Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 200 Alphameric Keyboard

Shorthand: F62

Form factor: 60%

The IBM Model 200 is the smallest alphanumeric keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal, introduced in December 1982. The Model 200 was intended to be the most basic full input device for the 4704, providing only limited user-assigned functions. Nicknamed "Kishsaver" after kishy.ca who introduced them to the mechanical keyboard community, these have become very desirable due to it being an example of an early "60%-er" mechanical keyboard. Starting in 2016, Model F Labs has developed and marketed a faithful recreation of the Model 200 designated as "F62".

Model F 4704 Model 300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard

Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard

Shorthand: F77

Form factor: 75%

The IBM Model 300 is an intermediate-sized alphanumeric keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal, introduced in December 1982. The Model 300 is essentially the same as the Model 200 but comes with an additional 15-key transparent-capped keypad on the right-hand side of the keyboard for user-assigned functions. Starting in 2016, Model F Labs has developed and marketed a faithful recreation of the Model 300 designated as "F77".

Model F 4704 Model 400 Administrative Keyboard

Variant of a Model F 4704 Model 400 Administrative Keyboard

Shorthand: F107

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Model 400 is the largest keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal. The Model 400 features an additional 30-key transparent-capped keypad on top of the Model 300's 77-key design, making it the most versatile and capable keyboard for the 4704.

Model F 3104/3178 Terminal Keyboard "Blue Switch"

Variant of a Model F 3104/3178 Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 3104/3178 Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 3104/3178 Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: F Blue Switch

Form factor: Navblockless

The so-called "blue switch" Model F terminal keyboards were a series of five distinct keyboards for originally the IBM 3178 Display Station in Q1 1983 and later for the IBM 3104 Display Terminal. Characterised by their blue switch used for toggling the terminal's display between uppercase + lowercase or uppercase-only display, these Model Fs featured a heavily modified XT-like layout with two or three function banks.

Model F 3101 Terminal Keyboard "Blue Switchless"

Variant of a Model F 3101 Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: F Blue Switchless

Form factor: Navblockless

The so-called "blue switchless" Model F terminal keyboard was a variant of the "blue switch" Model F terminal keyboard specifically for the IBM 3101 ASCII Display Station, lacking the blue switch feature found on its cousins. The internal assembly is largely interchangeable with its cousin, but the layout is more PC-like with the inclusion of a numeric keypad in place of the largest (right-most) function bank.

Model F 3290/5080 104-key Functional Key Keyboard "Unsaver"

Variant of a Model F 3290/5080 104-key Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: F Unsaver

Form factor: Unsaver

The so-called "unsaver" is the tenkeyless and original version of IBM's Functional Key Keyboards, made available for the IBM 3290 Information Panel and IBM 5080 Graphics System. It comes with both an XT-style 10-key function bank to the left of the alphanumeric block and a 24-key "PFxx" function key block above the alphanumeric block. The term "unsaver" describes the oxymoronic nature of this being a space-efficient design of an ever-larger keyboard despite the fact these are still as large as full-sized keyboards. These also feature two-setting feet, and their ISO-like layout likely played a role in cementing its usage with the later Model M keyboards.

Model F 3290-1 Keypad

Variant of a Model F 3290-1 Keypad

Form factor: Keypad

The IBM 3290-1 Keypads were a series of two detached 25-key peripherals for the IBM 3290 Information Panel designed to be used in tandem with the "unsaver" Functional Key Keyboard. Coming in numeric keypad and program function keypad flavours, these are the smallest known Model F assemblies. They are also extremely rare.

Model F 122-key Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model F 122-key Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 122-key Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 122-key Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model F 122-key Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: F122

Form factor: 120%

The 122-key "battleship"-sized IBM Functional Key Keyboard is an expanded and far more common version of the tenkeyless "unsaver" keyboards, adding an 18-key numeric keypad to the right side of the design. These battleships were available for the IBM 3179 Color Display Station, IBM 3180 Display Station, and IBM 3270 PC. It comes with both an XT-style 10-key function bank to the left of the alphanumeric block and a 24-key "Cmdxx" or "PFxx" function key block above the alphanumeric block. These too feature two-setting feet like the unsaver, and are also commonly referred to as the "F122".

Model F 4980 127-key Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model F 4980 127-key Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: F127

Form factor: 120%

IBM 4980 Display Station Keyboard is a variant of the 122-key IBM Functional Key Keyboard designed specifically for use with and only natively compatible with a IBM 4980 host. Like a standard "F122", it comes with both an XT-style 10-key function bank to the left of the alphanumeric block and a 24-key "PFxx" function key block above the alphanumeric block. These too feature two-setting feet, and are also commonly referred to as either "F122" or "F127".

Model F 9002 Laboratory Keyboard "Escort Carrier"

Variant of a Model F 9002 Laboratory Keyboard

The IBM System 9002 Hybrid Keyboard was a very unique variation of the Model F/XT designed for laboratory use and features a 57-key functional membrane key array on top of the design, replacing the dedicated "touch" panel found on previous IBM System 9000 family computers. The name "Hybrid" refers to the use of both capacitive buckling springs and membrane "touch panel" for the keys, which contrasts the IBM System 9001 Standard Keyboard that was simply a rebadged Model F/XT. The housing for the keyboard is likely a variation of the "unsaver" Functional Key Keyboard's case, meaning this is in fact also a hybrid of two Model F keyboard designs.

Model F/XT Portable PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/XT Portable PC Keyboard

Shorthand: F/XT Portable

Form factor: Navblockless

The IBM Portable Personal Computer Keyboard was a lightened and entirely plastic-cased version of the Model F/XT for the IBM 5155 Portable Personal Computer. The internal assembly is unchanged, with the cable connector being the only technical difference between them (although the protocol was also unchanged). A notable unique feature of this keyboard is the large hole in the case designed to help hide excess cable length in when the keyboard is folded down from the computer or hide the cable completely when folding up.

Model F/AT PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/AT PC Keyboard

Shorthand: F/AT

Form factor: Navblockless

The IBM Personal Computer AT Keyboard was the last unique Model F keyboard design. Designed for the IBM 5170 Personal Computer AT, the Model F/AT represented the next step towards the now-standard PC keyboard designs with its ANSI-like left shift key and separated numeric keypad despite some setbacks with its single-unit backspace and oversized enter/return key.

Model F/XT TEMPEST EM-Dampened Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/XT TEMPEST EM-Dampened Keyboard

Shorthand: F/XT TEMPEST

Form factor: Navblockless

The IBM EMR and EMR II Keyboards were the final variant of the Model F/XT, featuring different cables and connectors and shielding around the internal logic board. These keyboards were designed to be compliant with the shielding specification of codename TEMPEST, a NATO-recognised U.S. National Security Agency specification regarding methods of spying and protecting against spying with electronic equipment. In particular, these keyboards were designed to not radiate electromagnetic emanations to counter Van Eck phreaking.

Model M-based Typewriter Keyboard Assembly

Shorthand: M Typewriter

The 1984-debuting IBM Wheelwriters 3 and 5 and Quietwriter 7 were the first vessels of membrane buckling springs keyboard. What would become the Model M as we know them featured on all subsequent IBM and later Lexmark Wheelwriters for the next decade. The layouts of these keyboard assemblies were vaguely PC-like, with a max of T-nav arrow keys, one or two columns of left-side function keys, and occasionally even a numeric keypad section included on various models depending on their market segment. As a result, most Wheelwriter keyboards range from approximately 65% to 80% size layouts. The common feature amongst all of them was a split spacebar with the smaller "Code" key being an additional modifier for accessing functions throughout the keyboard.

Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard

Form factor: Full-size

The Model M terminal keyboards were the first introduction of the standard Model M design. Used on various IBM terminals such as the 3151, 3161, 3192, and various InfoWindow display stations, these keyboards heavily resemble PC-compatible IBM Enhanced Keyboards but commonly lack any lock-lights, featured 240-degree pin arranged DIN or modular 8P5C connectors, and have an extra key (102 vs 101 for ANSI, 103 vs 102 for ISO) by splitting the usual numeric keypad + key into two 1-unit keys. Unicomp is still able to produce keyboards to a similar spec.

Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard

Shorthand: M Industrial

Form factor: Full-size

The Model M industrial keyboards were the first PC-compatible Model Ms available, originally shipping with the AT-class IBM 7531 Industrial PC. Compared to the IBM Enhanced Keyboard, industrial Model Ms are essentially the same underneath but feature a grey-coloured case designed to hide the dirt and damage expected to be inflicted upon the device within an industrial environment.

Model M Type I Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model M Type I Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type I

Form factor: 120%

The Type I 122-key Model M terminal keyboard was the largest and heaviest Model M available. The design is largely an internal rework of the Model F-based equivalent, swapping out the capacitive assembly for a membrane one and changing the bottom metal pan the keyboard assembly sits to a plastic one. As such, it's almost impossible to tell the difference between the 122-key Model Fs and these Type I "M122s" from a visual inspection of the front or sides. These also operate with many of the same terminals "F122s" operate with, including the IBMs 3179, 3180 and 3205. These also retain the dual-setting riser-style feet and straight-shaped metal-jacketed 240-degree pin arranged DIN plug "F122s" had, and could have their 24-key function key block labelled in either "Cmdxx" or "PFxx" nomenclature.

Model M Type II Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model M Type II Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type II

Form factor: 120%

The Type II 122-key Model M terminal keyboard was a slight modification over the Type I, simply having underside-accessed flip-out feet instead of side-accessed dual-setting riser-style feet and having a right-angled plastic-jacketed 240-degree pin arranged DIN plug instead of a straight-shaped metal-jacketed one. The front case styling remains the same though, meaning a visual inspection from only the front cannot always distinguish between Type IIs, Type Is or even "F122s". However, a visual inspection from the sides can reveal the difference between a Type II and a Type I or "F122". Type IIs saw use with primarily IBM 3191, 3196, 3197 and 3206 terminals, although they could operate with several others too. Their 24-key function key block could be labelled in either "Cmdxx" or "PFxx" nomenclature like their predecessors.

Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard

Form factor: Full-size

The Enhanced Keyboard was the first home consumer, most common and the definitive Model M keyboard, becoming IBM's choice keyboard for a decade after its release and still in production today as the Unicomp Classic. Labelled as being "enhanced" in regards to its layout that became an industry standard and still used today with the addition of GUI keys, the Model M is perhaps the most well-known keyboard of all time thanks to the success of the Enhanced Keyboard and its main host system - the IBM Personal System/2 series. The Enhanced Keyboard was also made available for IBM's earlier "classic" Personal Computer series in both XT and AT flavours, and several other distinct variants exist for other types of systems and custom orders from third-party companies such Dell, Sabre and General Electric.

Model M ANPOS Keyboard

Variant of a Model M ANPOS Keyboard

Shorthand: M/AT ANPOS

Form factor: Navblockless

The IBM 4683/4684 Alphanumeric POS Keyboard is presently the only buckling springs based dedicated point-of-sales input device released by IBM. They were made for use with IBM's first PC-based POS system, specifically based on the IBM PC/AT. Thus, the keyboards themselves have an AT layout, which makes them a sort of "Model M/AT", if you will.

Model M Enhanced Keyboard with Speaker

Variant of a Model M Enhanced Keyboard with Speaker

Shorthand: M w/ Speaker

Form factor: Full-size

The Model Ms made for the IBM RT PC and RS/6000 systems were variants of the IBM Enhanced Keyboard featuring an integrated speaker on the underside of the keyboard. The speaker, which occupies a space usually left unfilled on other Enhanced Keyboards, is believed to act as an audible cue when keys as pressed. The speaker is operated by the host system via extra pins in the unique AMP-made connector (RT PC) or the unused pins in a PS/2 plug (RS/6000). For PS/2 variants, the keyboard itself can still be used with standard AT or PS/2 class PCs, however, the speaker cannot be utilised by them without creating an additional circuit to signal the usually unused pins.

Model M Space Saving Keyboard "SSK"

Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard

Shorthand: M/SSK

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The Space Saving Keyboard (SSK) were the tenkeyless and compacted version of the IBM Enhanced Keyboards originally available as an option for the IBM Personal System/2 series of computers. These are perhaps the most well-known Model M variant besides the Enhanced Keyboard. The fact that they weren't bundled with any systems and numeric keypads were viewed more favourably during the '80s, SSKs are relatively rare. As an attempt to provide an alternative to the loss of the numeric keypad, a togglable numeric keypad layer is present across the right side of the alphanumeric keys. They have since been spiritually succeeded by the Unicomp Mini Model M, which compared to the SSK feature a Type-A USB based module cable, lock-lights, black casing, Windows/GUI keys, and an upgraded membrane design.

Model M Screen Reader/2 Keypad

Variant of a Model M Screen Reader/2 Keypad

The IBM Screen Reader/2 Keypad was the peripheral component of the IBM Screen Reader/2, the first GUI-based screen reader designed to help people with hard or lack of sight access a PC running IBM Operating System/2, PC-DOS/MS-DOS, or Microsoft Windows. The keypad takes the form of an 18-key PS/2-compatible buckling springs keypad, featuring ten numeric keys, an asterisk key, a number sign help, and two two-unit vertical keys reading "HELP" and "STOP". These are one of two Model Ms whose internal assembly is based on an older Model F device and thus takes several production values from Model F designs; including individual barrels, metal barrel plate, foam padding, and no plastic rivets holding the assembly together. The assembly's previous incarnation was the 25-key IBM 3290-1 Information Panel program function and numeric keypads.

Model M Functional Keypad "M50"

Variant of a Model M Functional Keypad
Variant of a Model M Functional Keypad

Shorthand: M50

Form factor: 50% matrix

The 50-key Model M was a matrix-style keypad believed to be used with emulating IBM 4700 applications on IBM Personal System/2 or similar class machines. They possessed the same physical layout as the 50-key Model F-based IBM 4704 Model 100 keypads and could come with transparent, functional or alphameric legends. Technically speaking, these are the smallest Model Ms capable of featuring an alphameric layout. These are one of two Model Ms whose internal assembly is based on an older Model F device and thus takes several production values from Model F designs; including individual barrels, metal barrel plate, foam padding, and no plastic rivets holding the assembly together. The assembly's previous incarnation was the 50-key Model F IBM Model 100s these M50s replaced.

Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard "Battlecruiser"

Variant of a Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type III

Form factor: 120%

The Type III 122-key Model M terminal keyboard was a major overhaul over the previous two types' design. The design language of Type III is much closer to that of other Model Ms than Type I and Type II, which were both made to resemble the 122-key Model Fs they replaced. Type III is also smaller and lighter than its predecessors and completely did away with DIP switches. Whilst the protocol remained the same, the cable's plug was swapped from 240-degree pin arranged DIN to modular 8P5C (ethernet-like) to suit its typical host machines - the IBM InfoWindow and InfoWindow II series display stations. Whilst still possessing a coil, the cable's shape is also a flat design rather than round and it can be routed straight out the middle of the keyboard's rear or through two channels going to either side of the said rear. Unlike Types I and II and the "F122", Type III's 24-key function key block was only labelled with an "Fxx" nomenclature.

Model M Type IV PC Functional Key Keyboard "Battlecruiser"

Variant of a Model M Type IV PC Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Type IV PC Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Type IV PC Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type IV PC

Form factor: 120%

The Type IV 122-key Model M terminal keyboard is a version of the Type III designed to be natively compatible with PCs to serve in terminal emulation roles. Officially called the IBM Personal System/2 Host Connected Keyboard, Type IVs were relatively rare but for a long time were the only 122-key Model Ms easily capable of modern usage until Soarer's Converter became widespread. Visually, Type IVs look like Type IIIs except all IBM-branded versions had lock-light LEDs as standard and come with modular SDL connections capable of accepting an AT or PS/2 plug cable. IBM also started a practice producing Type IVs under third-party branding to companies that offer terminal emulation services, which Unicomp continues to do to this day. Unicomp also produces a version of the Type IV for consumer usage called the Unicomp PC-122. Like the Type IIIs, the 24-key function key block was only labelled with an "Fxx" nomenclature.

Model M Industrial Space Saving Keyboard "SSK"

Variant of a Model M Industrial Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Industrial Space Saving Keyboard

Shorthand: M/SSK Industrial

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The IBM Industrial Space Saving Keyboard was a variant of the SSK designed for blending in with industrial environments - in particular, heavily within the automotive industry. In a familiar fashion to the relationship between the IBM Enhanced Keyboard and its industrial variants, the only difference is the grey casing designed to hide the dirt and discolouration expected to be inflicted upon the device within an industrial environment. Functionally, SSKs and industrial SSKs are identical. In particular, industrial SSKs seemed to have been popular in the automotive industry during the early '90s.

Model M1 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Variant of a Model M1 Selectric Touch Keyboard
Variant of a Model M1 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Shorthand: M1

Form factor: Full-size

The Model M1 was one of two lightweight alternatives to the Enhanced Keyboard released as the first of the numbered Model M variants. Whilst M1s fundamentally used the same buckling springs switches, almost everything else about the design was changed as they have no metal backplate, an integrated front cover and barrel plate, and a completely different logic board featuring surface-mounted components. The M1 was exclusively sold as a standalone product under the Easy OPTIONS by IBM branding, which contrasts its otherwise identical Model M2 siblings that were bundled with IBM systems. Despite being known as the Selectric Touch keyboard, these have no relation to the IBM Selectric typewriter family.

Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Variant of a Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard
Variant of a Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Shorthand: M2

Form factor: Full-size

The Model M2 was one of two lightweight alternatives to the Enhanced Keyboard released as the first of the numbered Model M variants. Whilst M2s fundamentally mostly used the same buckling springs switches, almost everything else about the design was changed as they have no metal backplate, an integrated front cover and barrel plate, and a completely different logic board featuring surface-mounted components. The M2 was bundled with IBM Personal System/1 family low-end computers, which contrasts its otherwise identical Model M1 siblings that were sold exclusively as standalone products. Unlike the M1, however, a Quiet Touch rubber dome variant of the M2 was made. Despite being known as the Selectric Touch keyboard, these have no relation to the IBM Selectric typewriter family.

Model M2 Terminal Keyboard

Variant of a Model M2 Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M2 Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: M2

Form factor: Full-size

The terminal variant of Model M2 was exclusively designed and released for the IBM 3153 InfoWindow II Color ASCII Display Station. The terminal M2s were functionally identical to the standard Selectric Touch M2s, except they possess a modular 6P5C ("RJ-25"-like) connector instead of PS/2. These keyboards were produced in two variations; PC-style featuring standard Enhanced Keyboard-like legends and ASCII-style featuring many terminal-centric legends.

Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard with Expanded Border

Variant of a Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard with Expanded Border

Shorthand: M2

Form factor: Full-size

The bordered variant of the Model M2 was a Quiet Touch rubber dome-only variant of the PC-compatible M2 designed to mimic the footprint of an IBM Enhanced Keyboard. The frame that provides the border has no technical purpose and the rest of the keyboard is the same as a standard Model M2. Such M2s were apparently made exclusively for IBM EduQuest PCs.

Model M3-based L40SX/CL57SX Keyboard

Variant of a Model M3-based L40SX/CL57SX Keyboard
Variant of a Model M3-based L40SX/CL57SX Keyboard

Shorthand: M3

The IBM Personal System/2 L40SX was an early laptop that featured IBM's first buckling sleeves keyboard assembly, which represented the first step of a major divergence in the Model M family that broke the largely buckling springs-based paradigm. Whilst not specifically designated a Model M, the L40SX's numeric keypad option with the same switches and the discrete Model M4 keyboards that used the same assemblies were designated members of the Model M family, and this was the origin for both. The 1992-launched IBM CL57SX also possessed the same buckling sleeves keyboard assembly, albeit in black and had an overlayed numeric keypad layer much like the SSK.

Model M3 Numeric Keypad

Variant of a Model M3 Numeric Keypad

Shorthand: M3

Form factor: Keypad

The Model M3 numeric keypad was an optional peripheral for the IBM Personal System/2 L40SX laptop. The keypad uses the same buckling sleeves switches as the host laptop, making it notable as being the first discrete device featuring IBM's buckling sleeves switches. The keypad sports a passthrough PS/2 mouse socket, but it connects to the host laptop via a proprietary connection.

"Model M3" Keyboard

Shorthand: M3

Form factor: Full-size

The "Model M3" is a singular IBM 3153 InfoWindow II Color ASCII Display Station keyboard (P/N 25H2142) that is seemingly just a PC-style Model M2 terminal keyboard with the "M3" designation. The earliest appearance of the keyboard was 1995, so given the fact the M3 designation already existed and was assigned to IBM Personal System/2 L40SX devices several years before that year, it's likely P/N 25H2142 feature a misprint on the label.

Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard

Variant of a Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard

Shorthand: M4

The IBM Space Saver Keyboard (not to be confused with the IBM Space Saving Keyboard or SSK) was the discrete desktop and server environment adaptation of the IBM Personal System/2 L40SX laptop's Model M3-based buckling sleeves keyboard assembly. The Model M4 is a straight adaptation of that assembly, featuring the same layout but available with beige or black case colour. M4s were originally produced by Lexmark and Key Tronic, however, Unicomp continued production until the late 2000s. Unicomp's internal codename for the M4 family was "Surf".

Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard

Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard

Shorthand: M4-1

The IBM Space Saver Keyboard with TrackPoint II (not to be confused with the IBM Space Saving Keyboard or SSK) was the discrete desktop and server environment adaptation of the IBM Personal System/2 L40SX laptop's Model M3-based buckling sleeves keyboard assembly. Compared to the standard Model M4, the M4-1 is a modified design that equips a TrackPoint II pointing stick. These M4-1s were notable for being the first IBM desktop keyboard to feature TrackPoint strain gauge technology and the only Model M to retain such a stick when produced by Unicomp. M4-1s were originally produced by Lexmark and Key Tronic, however, Unicomp continued production until the late 2000s. Unicomp's internal codename for the M4 family was "Surf".

Model M4-1 Space Saver Numeric Keypad

Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver Numeric Keypad

Shorthand: M4-1

Form factor: Keypad

The IBM Space Saver Numeric Keypad is the complimentary numeric keypad option available for pairing with Model M4 and M4-1 keyboards. It's largely the same design as the IBM Personal System/2's L40SX numeric keypad option, however, the case is enlarged to match the design of the host M4/M4-1 and an extra "00" key is added at the expense of reducing the "0/Ins" key to a single key-unit size. Without modification, these keypads can only be used when coupled to an M4 or M4-1 host keyboard via a modular 10P10C ("RJ-50"-like) cable.

Model M5-1 Trackball Keyboard

Shorthand: M5-1

Form factor: Full-size

The Model M5-1 is one of two variants of the Enhanced Keyboard featuring an integrated trackball pointing device attachment, along with the M5-2. The M5-1 uses a 16mm trackball placed around the arrow keys and features four mouse buttons; two for left and right click and two for left and right stepped-click. The M5-1 is the rarer of the two due to its withdrawal from production not long after its introduction. It is presently believed that the M5-1 was withdrawn due to production complexities with integrating the trackball module on top of the keyboard assembly. Collectively, the M5s were the last introduced Model M variants to feature a modular SDL connection.

Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard

Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard

Shorthand: M5-2

Form factor: Full-size

The Model M5-2 is one of two variants of the Enhanced Keyboard featuring an integrated trackball pointing device attachment, along with the M5-1. The M5-2 uses a 25mm trackball placed on the top-left corner of the keyboard case and features eight mouse buttons; two for left and right click and two for left and right stepped-click, with both pairs repeated on the back-side of the trackball module. Unlike the M5-1, the M5-2 has remained in production and continues to be produced by Unicomp as the Unicomp Classic Trackball Keyboard (also previously called "On-The-Ball"). Collectively, the M5s were the last introduced Model M variants to feature a modular SDL connection. However, Unicomp has since moved the M5-2 to a fixed cable design.

Model M5-2/M13 Hybrid Keyboard

Variant of a Model M5-2/M13 Hybrid Keyboard

Shorthand: M5-2 / M13

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp On-The-Ball Plus was a specialised combined variant of the Model M5-2 and Model M13 keyboard designs that sold for only a short time. The trackball module was the same 25mm module always used on Model M5-2s, however, the pointing stick was Unicomp's own force-sensitive resistor implementation like Unicomp-era On-The-Point Model M13s.

Model M6 ThinkPad Keyboard Assembly

Variant of a Model M6 ThinkPad Keyboard Assembly
Variant of a Model M6 ThinkPad Keyboard Assembly
Variant of a Model M6 ThinkPad Keyboard Assembly
Variant of a Model M6 ThinkPad Keyboard Assembly

Shorthand: M6

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The original Model M6 was the keyboard assembly for the IBM ThinkPad 700 and 720 series and IBM PS/55 Note C52 portable computers. Produced exclusively by Lexmark for IBM, the Model M6 was a relatively short-lived design as it was revised and superseded by the Model M6-1 not long after the ThinkPad 700 and PS/55 Note C52 were released. Technically speaking, they were an evolution of the Model M3/M4 buckling sleeves keyboard that further compacted the form factor and slightly altered the buckling sleeves switch to use a barrel-based slider actuator instead of a keycap-based rod actuator for registering keypresses when the key is pressed down.

Model M6-1 ThinkPad Keyboard Assembly

Shorthand: M6-1

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The Model M6-1 was a wide range of IBM ThinkPad portable computer keyboard assemblies produced between 1993 and 1997. Model M6-1 was a minor revision of the original Model M6 buckling sleeves keyboard assembly, with the main change being how the keyboard supports being mounted into a laptop. The Model M6-1 saw much wider adoption than its predecessor, first known to be used on the IBM ThinkPad 750 series and last known to be used on the IBM RS/6000 Notebook 860. M6-1s were largely produced by Lexmark, however, assemblies built after April 1996 were produced by Key Tronic to the same specifications and thus should not be confused with Key Tronic's own buckling sleeves keyboard implementation used on the IBM ThinkPads 701C series. As with the M6, M6-1s were essentially an evolution of the Model M3/M4 buckling sleeves keyboard that further compacted the form factor and slightly altered the buckling sleeves switch to use a barrel-based slider actuator instead of a keycap-based rod actuator for registering keypresses when the key is pressed down.

Classic ThinkPad Keyboard Assembly

Shorthand: ThinkPad

Form factor: Tenkeyless

Model M7 POS Keypad

Variant of a Model M7 POS Keypad

Shorthand: M7

Form factor: Keypad

The IBM Retail POS Keyboard was one of five Model M-designated POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993 and is a 50-key functional keypad. The Model M7 was the standard keypad for IBM's POS terminals from thereafter. In its default layout, 49 of the 50 keys are individual, and the middle bank has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two key positions (hence 49). The single key on its own serves as a dedicated Ctrl key. The other slightly larger keys are designed to be programmable and thus have transparent keytops. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing the M7 under their own branding.

Model M7 POS MSR Keypad

Variant of a Model M7 POS MSR Keypad

Shorthand: M7/MSR

Form factor: Keypad

The IBM Retail POS Keyboard w/ Card Reader was one of five Model M-designated POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993 and is a 50-key functional keypad with an integrated magnetic stripe reader. The Model M7 was the standard keypad for IBM's POS terminals from thereafter. In its default layout, 49 of the 50 keys are individual, and the middle bank has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two key positions (hence 49). The single key on its own serves as a dedicated Ctrl key. The other slightly larger keys are designed to be programmable and thus have transparent keytops. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing the M7 MSR under their own branding.

Model M8 POS LCD MSR Keypad

Variant of a Model M8 POS LCD MSR Keypad

Shorthand: M8

Form factor: Keypad

The IBM Retail POS Keyboard /w Card Reader and Display was one of five Model M-designated POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993 and is a 50-key functional keypad with an integrated adjustable-tilt LCD display. The Model M8 is essentially an enlarged M7 keypad with an LCD display in the top-left corner and no option to have it without a magnetic stripe reader. In its default layout, 49 of the 50 keys are individual, and the middle bank has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two key positions (hence 49). The single key on its own serves as a dedicated Ctrl key. The other slightly larger keys are designed to be programmable and thus have transparent keytops. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing the M8 under their own branding.

Model M9 ANPOS MSR Keyboard

Variant of a Model M9 ANPOS MSR Keyboard

Shorthand: M9

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Retail ANPOS Keyboard w/ Card Reader was one of five Model M-designated POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993 and is a 116-key alphanumeric keyboard. The M9 has two distinct types of keys - the 60%-size alphanumeric standard keys and the transparent keytop keys its M7, M8 and M11 siblings use. Like its siblings, a dedicated numeric keypad is found within the transparent-topped keys and gives enough spacing between the alphas and itself to allow for a full Enhanced layout configuration if desired. Of note is that the M9 always comes with an ANSI left shift and ISO enter as part of its layout. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing the M9 under their own branding.

Model M11 POS MSR Key Array

Variant of a Model M11 POS MSR Key Array

Shorthand: M11

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Modifiable Layout Keyboard was one of five Model M-designated POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993 and is a 133-key point-of-sale matrix keyboard or "key array". The Model M11 is a variant of the Model M9 ANPOS MSR Keyboard constructed entirely of single-unit, transparent keytop keys (excluding the dedicated numeric keypad and the Ctrl key located at the top-left corner). The M11 can be used as a functional keypad or an ortholinear alphanumeric keyboard. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing the M11 under their own branding.

Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard

Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard

Shorthand: M13

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Enhanced Keyboard with TrackPoint II (or simply IBM TrackPoint II Keyboard) was a variant of the Enhanced Keyboard with an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick. Also available with Lexmark-only branding, the M13 is one of the more well-known variants of the Enhanced Keyboard. The M13 also came with a PS/2 passthrough port for external mice at the rear, and have noticeably stronger case texturing compared to most other Model Ms. Production for these TrackPoint M13s were split between Lexmark and Maxi Switch, with Lexmark largely producing beige ones and Maxi Switch largely producing the more infamous black ones. Due to limitations with dye-sublimation, black M13s use pad-printed legends on their keycaps.

Model M13 TrackPoint II/FSR Industrial Keyboard

Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II/FSR Industrial Keyboard

Shorthand: M13 Industrial

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Industrial Keyboard with TrackPoint II or Pointing Stick were variants of the Model M13 designed for blending in with industrial environments. Like other industrial IBM keyboards, the grey casing is for hiding dirt and discolouration expected to be inflicted upon the keyboard within an industrial environment. The first industrial M13s were built by Maxi Switch for IBM and were fitted with TrackPoint II pointing sticks, however, Unicomp later produced a visually indistinguishable version that used Unicomp's FSR pointing stick instead.

Model M13 FSR Keyboard

Variant of a Model M13 FSR Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 FSR Keyboard

Shorthand: M13

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp On-The-Stick (also known as the Unicomp Pointing Stick Keyboard) was the continuation of Model M13 production after Lexmark and Maxi Switch had finished producing them. Whilst outwardly similar to the former OEMs' M13s, the On-The-Sticks had three major differences underneath; the replacement of TrackPoint II with their own FSR technology, improved tactility on the mouse buttons, and the passthrough PS/2 mouse port on the back became optional. Until about 2004, IBM continued to have Unicomp produce new M13s for them based on the On-The-Stick revision. The M13 line finally exited production around 2009, where it was succeeded by the Unicomp EnduraPro that was originally a bezel-reduced compacted alternative to it.

Model M15 Adjustable Keyboard

Variant of a Model M15 Adjustable Keyboard
Variant of a Model M15 Adjustable Keyboard

Shorthand: M15

Form factor: Ergo tenkeyless

The Model M15 was a highly adjustable ergonomic tenkeyless-like keyboard based on the Model M1/M2 design and was branded as either the IBM Adjustable Keyboard or Lexmark Select-Ease Keyboard. Being the only ergonomic keyboard as per today's standards that IBM ever marketed, the Model M15 features a high degree of customisability; including split, tilt, swivel and tenting capabilities. For convenience, the arrow keys are duplicated on both halves of the keyboard and the split spacebar has an Erase-Eaze feature. It is a candidate for the last IBM-sanctioned buckling springs keyboard design.

Model M15 Numeric Keypad

Variant of a Model M15 Numeric Keypad

Shorthand: M15

Form factor: Keypad

The Model M15 numeric keypad was an optional accompaniment for the Model M15 adjustable keyboard. It takes the form of a 17-key buckling springs keypad based on Model M1/M2 design principles like its host keyboard and uses a proprietary modular connection. The keypad also has four flip-out feet to allow the user to match the profile of the host keyboard and its adjustable ergonomic feet. These are most likely the smallest official IBM buckling springs device available.

Model M SpaceSaver TrackPoint II Keyboard

Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver TrackPoint II Keyboard

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM 5576-C01 Keyboard was a unique compact-profile full-sized Model M offshoot featuring an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick. It was specifically designed for use with the IBM PS/55E, an all-in-one PC exclusively sold in Japan. The 5576-C01 has the unique distinction of being amongst the relatively few Japanese IBM keyboards that weren't made by Alps Electric or Brother and the only buckling springs Japanese keyboard that doesn't use Brother buckling springs. These however use modified buckling springs that are said to feel slightly different to other Model Ms. The most unique feature with these is the large rotating vertical stand that allows you to park the keyboards upwards on its back wall. They could also come in proprietary combined signal PS/2-like cable or a more standard Y-split keyboard and mouse PS/2 cable. It is a candidate for the last IBM-sanctioned buckling springs keyboard design and its moulds were later used to produce the Unicomp EnduraPro/SpaceSaver family.

Model M SpaceSaver FSR Keyboard

Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver FSR Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver FSR Keyboard

Shorthand: M/EP

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp EnduraPro is a compact-profile full-size Model M featuring the thinnest side bezels ever put to a Model M design. It was introduced around the turn of the Millenium and eventually gave rise to the SpaceSaver/Ultra Classic family of keyboards that lacked integrated pointing sticks. EnduraPros are produced using the same moulds formerly used to make IBM 5576-C01 keyboards in the '90s. Unlike the 5576-C01, these use Unicomp's unique FSR pointing sticks instead of IBM TrackPoint II.

Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard

Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M SpaceSaver Keyboard

Shorthand: M/UC

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp Ultra Classic (PC) and Unicomp SpaceSaver M (Mac) are compact-profile full-size Model Ms featuring the thinnest side bezels ever put to a Model M design. Like its EnduraPro sibling, the SpaceSaver family are produced using the same moulds formerly used to make IBM 5576-C01 keyboards in the '90s. Unlike the EnduraPro or 5576-C01, these do not feature any integrated pointing stick. The Ultra Classic was also previously known as simply the SpaceSaver and should not be confused with the IBM Space Saving Keyboard (SSK) or Space Saver Keyboard (Model M4-1).

"Model M-e" POS Monitor-Mounted Keypad

Variant of a "Model M-e" POS Monitor-Mounted Keypad

Shorthand: M-e

Form factor: Keypad

The POS monitor-mounted keypad is one of five Model "M-e" successors to the Model M7/M8/M9/M11 family of POS input devices and is a compact 32-key keypad. This smallest member of the "M-e" family typically mounted on the right side of various IBM SurePoint point-of-sale touchscreen monitors. In its default layout, 31 of the 32 keys are individually discrete, typically featuring a numeric keypad with a zero key taking up two key positions (hence 31) and a Ctrl key on the lower 4x4 key bank. Unlike most other IBM POS input devices, all the keys are single-unit sized. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing these under their own branding.

"Model M-e" POS Modular Keypad

Variant of a "Model M-e" POS Modular Keypad
Variant of a "Model M-e" POS Modular Keypad

Shorthand: M-e

Form factor: Keypad

The POS modular keypad is one of five Model "M-e" successors to the Model M7/M8/M9/M11 family of POS input devices and is a 67-key functional keypad. It is a direct enhancement of the Model M7 design, designed for a similar purpose but given 17 extra keys and always includes a magnetic stripe reader. Like the M7, the middle bank of keys has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two key positions and a dedicated Ctrl key is still found in the top-left quadrant of the keypad. The "modular" title comes from the fact that the key lock mechanism is now an optional attachment, allowing for the possibility of a fingerprint reader attachment as an alternative security mechanism. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing these under their own branding.

"Model M-e" POS Modular LCD Keypad

Variant of a "Model M-e" POS Modular LCD Keypad
Variant of a "Model M-e" POS Modular LCD Keypad

Shorthand: M-e

Form factor: Keypad

The POS modular LCD keypad is one of five Model "M-e" successors to the Model M7/M8/M9/M11 family of POS input devices and is a 67-key functional keypad with an integrated adjustable-tilt LCD display. It is a direct enhancement of the Model M8 design, designed for a similar purpose but given 17 extra keys. Like the M8, the middle bank of keys has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two key positions and a dedicated Ctrl key is still found as an individual key next to the status lights. The "modular" title comes from the fact that the key lock mechanism is now an optional attachment, allowing for the possibility of a fingerprint reader attachment as an alternative security mechanism. After Toshiba acquired the IBM Retail Store Solutions division in 2012, Toshiba Retail continued producing these under their own branding.

"Model M-e" CANPOS Keyboard

Variant of a "Model M-e" CANPOS Keyboard
Variant of a "Model M-e" CANPOS Keyboard

Shorthand: M-e

Form factor: Compact full-size

"Model M-e" ANPOS Keyboard

Variant of a "Model M-e" ANPOS Keyboard
Variant of a "Model M-e" ANPOS Keyboard
Variant of a "Model M-e" ANPOS Keyboard
Variant of a "Model M-e" ANPOS Keyboard

Shorthand: M-e

Form factor: Full-size

Model M Enhanced ANPOS Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced ANPOS Keyboard

Shorthand: MPOS

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp Point of Sale with Magnetic Stripe Reader is a modified Unicomp Classic keyboard designed for retail systems usage. It is one of two buckling springs keyboards equipped with a magnetic stripe reader.

New Model M Space Saving Full-Sized Keyboard

Variant of a New Model M Space Saving Full-Sized Keyboard
Variant of a New Model M Space Saving Full-Sized Keyboard
Variant of a New Model M Space Saving Full-Sized Keyboard
Variant of a New Model M Space Saving Full-Sized Keyboard

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp New Model M was the first new Model M design introduced in almost twenty years when it launched in 2020. It's essentially the successor to the Unicomp Ultra Classic, taking up the market position of a reduced-bezel but full-size Model M. Stylistically, the New Model M is much closer than its predecessor to a typical Model M design. In fact, it resembles a full-size version of the IBM Space Saving Keyboard matching its depth and height profile, however, unlike the SSK, the side bezels were reduced in width.

ThinkPad-style Discrete Full-Size UltraNav Keyboard

Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete Full-Size UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete Full-Size UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete Full-Size UltraNav Keyboard

Form factor: Full-size

The SK-8835 was the largest member of the LITE-ON produced SK-8835/SK-884x ThinkPad-style keyboard family, uniquely featuring a dedicated numeric keypad that makes the keyboard effectively a full-size keyboard in the footprint of a traditional tenkeyless. Introduced in 2003, these made use of the Synaptics TouchStyk pointing stick and Synaptics TouchPad trackpad. Most part numbers were withdrawn by Lenovo in 2009. Market names include IBM USB Keyboard with UltraNav or Lenovo ThinkPad Full-Size UltraNav USB Keyboard.

ThinkPad-style Discrete UltraNav Keyboard

Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete UltraNav Keyboard

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The SK-8840, SK-8845 and SK-8845RC were the most common members of the LITE-ON produced SK-8835/SK-884x ThinkPad-style keyboard family. The SK-8840 and SK-8845 were both introduced in 2004 as the PS/2 and USB version (respectively) of the same design. The SK-8845RC was released by 2010 and was a variant of the SK-8845 with a longer USB cable. All three made use of the Synaptics TouchStyk pointing stick and Synaptics TouchPad trackpad. Market names include IBM PS/2 Travel Keyboard with UltraNav (SK-8840), IBM USB Travel Keyboard with UltraNav, IBM USB Travel Keyboard Option (SK-8845), IBM UltraNav USB Keyboard or IBM Keyboard with Integrated Pointing Device USB (SK-8845RC).

ThinkPad-style Discrete Keyboard

Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete Keyboard
Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete Keyboard
Variant of a ThinkPad-style Discrete Keyboard

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The SK-8845CR is the latest member of the LITE-ON produced SK-8835/SK-884x ThinkPad-style keyboard family. It was a trackpad-less version of the SK-8845RC released by 2013, making it the only non-UltraNav member of the family but it still retained a Synaptics TouchStyk pointing stick. It was typically only known by the name IBM Keyboard with Integrated Pointing Device USB, although a single part number from Lenovo is called the Lenovo UltraNav Keyboard USB despite it lacking a trackpad. The SK-8845CR is likely the last IBM-branded ThinkPad-derived/style product introduced.

Classic ThinkPad Discrete Keyboard

Variant of a Classic ThinkPad Discrete Keyboard
Variant of a Classic ThinkPad Discrete Keyboard
Variant of a Classic ThinkPad Discrete Keyboard

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The Lenovo ThinkPad USB Keyboard with TrackPoint (SK-8855) was Lenovo's first discrete ThinkPad/TrackPoint keyboard. It was introduced in 2009 and utilised the same keyboard design that was introduced with the Lenovo ThinkPad T400s and later used by xx10 and xx20 generation ThinkPads.

AccuType ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard

Shorthand: AccuType

The AccuType ThinkPad Keyboard was Lenovo's replacement to the long line of classic Model M6/M6-1 derived keyboard designs introduced in 2011 with Lenovo ThinkPad X1 and deployed as the sole ThinkPads keyboard design the following year. The AccuType's keytops are wider than before and the switches have reduced key travel, but they still largely resemble the feel of previous classic ThinkPad keyboards. All standard versions feature a TrackPoint IV pointing stick.

AccuType ThinkPad Optical Trackpoint Keyboard

Shorthand: AccuType

The Optical TrackPoint variant of the AccuType ThinkPad Keyboard was a slightly condensed and reduced key travel version of the standard AccuType keyboard used specifically by 2011's Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet Keyboard Folio Case and 2013's Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2 Bluetooth Keyboard with Stand. This variant was not well received, thus the design was abandoned after the 2013 keyboard exited production.

TrackPoint-Equipped Keyboard

Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Keyboard

Shorthand: TPFS

Form factor: Full-size

TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard

Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard

Shorthand: TPSS

Form factor: Tenkeyless

Lighted Program Function Keyboard

Variant of a Lighted Program Function Keyboard
Variant of a Lighted Program Function Keyboard
Variant of a Lighted Program Function Keyboard
Variant of a Lighted Program Function Keyboard

Shorthand: LPFK

Form factor: LPFK

A Lighted Program Function Keyboard in IBM circles is a specialised keypad that has an array of 32 keys and accompanying LEDs. These keypads closely integrate with supporting software on the host computer, granting each key a function with the key's LED indicating the availability of said function. The typical usage for LPFKs is computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing.