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Keyboard Types

This is an exhaustive overview of the known major Model F, Model M and ThinkPad family keyboard variants. Note that many of these are not official designations - these are based on enthusiast categorisation to help distinct them apart by word.

70 keyboard types listed...

Model F Datamaster Desktop Keyboard "Bezelmaster"

Variant of a Model F Datamaster Desktop Keyboard

Shorthand: F Datamaster

The Model F Datamaster Desktop Keyboard was the first buckling springs keyboard released by IBM and is in fact an integrated assembly inside the IBM 5322 System/23 Datamaster computer. Released in July 1981, the general layout and physical assembly would be reused only a month later for the IBM 5150 Personal Computer as the Model F/XT. Whilst rare and its host computer very expensive, this keyboard has the honour of being the first of a very successful line of keyboards.

Model F/XT PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/XT PC Keyboard

Shorthand: F/XT

The IBM Personal Computer Keyboard was the first individually distinct and most common Model F keyboard. Debuting with the IBM 5150 Personal Computer (the original IBM PC) in August 1981 and later featured with the IBM 5160 Personal Computer XT (that gave it its common nickname) Model F/XT, this keyboard played an important role in establishing the PC as a high-quality computer and solidifying buckling springs-based keyboards as IBM's go-to for well over a decade after its release. Relative the competition, the Model F/XT brought unsurpassed reliability and build quality to the mix but arguably suffered from a layout too different from others.

Model F Electronic Typewriter Keyboard Assembly

Shorthand: F Typewriter

Capacitive buckling springs assemblies were briefly featured with the IBM Electronic Typewriter Models 65, 85 and 95 from 1982 as an intermediary step between the older mechanical Selectric typewriter family and Model M-based Wheelwriter family. They are also amongst the smallest Model Fs made.

Model F Displaywriter Keyboard

Variant of a Model F Displaywriter Keyboard

Shorthand: F

The IBM Displaywriter Type B Keyboard was the low-profile and ergonomic replacement for the beam spring-based Type A keyboard for the IBM 6580 Displaywriter System word processor made available some time in 1982. Featuring the same layout as its predecessor, the Type B features an early complete ISO-like alphanumeric block that would later be used by the IBM Functional Key Keyboard series and ISO-based IBM Enhanced Keyboards.

Model F Terminal Keyboard "Bigfoot"

Variant of a Model F Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: F Bigfoot

The so-called "bigfoot" Model F terminal keyboard was a detached variant of the Model F keyboard assembly found inside the IBM 5322 System/23 made especially for the IBM 5291 Display Station and features the IBM 5251 Display Station's beam spring keyboard layout. Looking like an enlarged Model F/XT, the keyboard features extremely enlarged bezels acting as a sort of palm rest and comes with three-setting adjustable feet larger than any other feet found on IBM keyboards.

Model F100 Functional Keypad "F50"

Variant of a Model F100 Functional Keypad

Shorthand: F50

Form factor: 50% matrix

The IBM Model 100 was the first and smallest keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal introduced in October 1982 and is the second smallest known Model F assembly. Usually featuring 45 transparent keys and 5 hard-set function keys, the Model 100 acted as a sort of macro pad for the system by allowing the user to map functions to those 45 transparent keys and put custom labels underneath them.

Model F200 Alphameric Keyboard "Kishsaver"

Variant of a Model F200 Alphameric Keyboard

Shorthand: F62

Form factor: 60%

The IBM Model 200 is the smallest alphanumeric keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal, introduced in December 1982. The Model 200 was intended to be the most basic full input device for the 4704, providing only limited user-assigned functions. Nicknamed "Kishsaver" after kishy.ca who introduced them to the mechanical keyboard community, these have become very desirable due to it being an example of an early "60%-er" mechanical keyboard. Starting in 2016, Model F Labs has developed and marketed a faithful recreation of the Model 200 designated as "F62".

Model F300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard

Variant of a Model F300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard

Shorthand: F77

The IBM Model 300 is an intermediate-sized alphanumeric keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal, introduced in December 1982. The Model 300 is essentially the same as the Model 200 but comes with an additional 15-key transparent-capped keypad on the right-hand side of the keyboard for user-assigned functions. Starting in 2016, Model F Labs has developed and marketed a faithful recreation of the Model 300 designated as "F77".

Model F400 Administrative Keyboard

Variant of a Model F400 Administrative Keyboard

Shorthand: F107

The IBM Model 400 is the largest keyboard for the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System's 4704 terminal. The Model 400 features an additional 30-key transparent-capped keypad on top of the Model 300's 77-key design, making it the most versatile and capable keyboard for the 4704.

Model F Terminal Keyboard "Blue Switch"

Variant of a Model F Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model F Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model F Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: F Blue Switch

The so-called "blue switch" Model F terminal keyboards were a series of five distinct keyboards for originally the IBM 3178 Display Station in Q1 1983 and later for the IBM 3104 Display Terminal. Characterised by their blue switch used for toggling the terminal's display between uppercase + lowercase or uppercase-only display, these Model Fs featured a heavily modified XT-like layout with two or three function banks.

Model F Terminal Keyboard "Blue Switchless"

Variant of a Model F Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: F Blue Switchless

The so-called "blue switchless" Model F terminal keyboard was a variant of the "blue switch" Model F terminal keyboard specifically for the IBM 3101 ASCII Display Station, lacking the blue switch feature found on its cousins. The internal assembly is largely interchangeable with its cousin, but the layout is more PC-like with the inclusion of a numeric keypad in place of the largest (right-most) function bank.

Model F Functional Key Keyboard "Unsaver"

Variant of a Model F Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: F Unsaver

The so-called "unsaver" is the tenkeyless and original version of IBM's Functional Key Keyboards, made available for the IBM 3290 Information Panel and IBM 5080 Graphics System. It comes with both an XT-style 10-key function bank to the left of the alphanumeric block and a 24-key "PFxx" function key block above the alphanumeric block. The term "unsaver" describes the oxymoronic nature of this being a space-efficient design of an ever-larger keyboard despite the fact these are still as large as full-sized keyboards. These also feature two-setting feet, and their ISO-like layout likely played a role in cementing its usage with the later Model M keyboards.

Model F Keypad

Variant of a Model F Keypad

Shorthand: F

The IBM 3290-1 Keypads were a series of two detached 25-key peripherals for the IBM 3290 Information Panel designed to be used in tandem with the "unsaver" Functional Key Keyboard. Coming in numeric keypad and program function keypad flavours, these are the smallest known Model F assemblies. They are also extremely rare.

Model F Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model F Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model F Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model F Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model F Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: F122

Form factor: 120%

The 122-key "battleship"-sized IBM Functional Key Keyboard is an expanded and far more common version of the tenkeyless "unsaver" keyboards, adding an 18-key numeric keypad to the right side of the design. These battleships were available for the IBM 3179 Color Display Station, IBM 3180 Display Station, and IBM 3270 PC. It comes with both an XT-style 10-key function bank to the left of the alphanumeric block and a 24-key "Cmdxx" or "PFxx" function key block above the alphanumeric block. These too feature two-setting feet like the unsaver, and are also commonly referred to as the "F122".

Model F Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model F Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: F127

Form factor: 120%

IBM 4980 Display Station Keyboard is a variant of the 122-key IBM Functional Key Keyboard designed specifically for use with and only natively compatible with a IBM 4980 host. Like a standard "F122", it comes with both an XT-style 10-key function bank to the left of the alphanumeric block and a 24-key "PFxx" function key block above the alphanumeric block. These too feature two-setting feet, and are also commonly referred to as either "F122" or "F127".

Model F Laboratory Keyboard with Membrane Key Array "Escort Carrier"

Variant of a Model F Laboratory Keyboard with Membrane Key Array

Shorthand: F

The IBM System 9002 Hybrid Keyboard was a very unique variation of the Model F/XT designed for laboratory use and features a 57-key functional membrane key array on top of the design, replacing the dedicated "touch" panel found on previous IBM System 9000 family computers. The name "Hybrid" refers to the use of both capacitive buckling springs and membrane "touch panel" for the keys, which contrasts the IBM System 9001 Standard Keyboard that was simply a rebadged Model F/XT. The housing for the keyboard is likely a variation of the "unsaver" Functional Key Keyboard's case, meaning this is in fact also a hybrid of two Model F keyboard designs.

Model F/XT Portable PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/XT Portable PC Keyboard

Shorthand: F/XT Portable

The IBM Portable Personal Computer Keyboard was a lightened and entirely plastic-cased version of the Model F/XT for the IBM 5155 Portable Personal Computer. The internal assembly is unchanged, with the cable connector being the only technical difference between them (although the protocol was also unchanged). A notable unique feature of this keyboard is the large hole in the case designed to help hide excess cable length in when the keyboard is folded down from the computer or hide the cable completely when folding up.

Model F/AT PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/AT PC Keyboard

Shorthand: F/AT

The IBM Personal Computer AT Keyboard was the last unique Model F keyboard design. Designed for the IBM 5170 Personal Computer AT, the Model F/AT represented the next step towards the now-standard PC keyboard designs with its ANSI-like left shift key and separated numeric keypad despite some setbacks with its single-unit backspace and oversized enter/return key.

Model F/XT TEMPEST EM-Dampened Keyboard

Variant of a Model F/XT TEMPEST EM-Dampened Keyboard

Shorthand: F/XT TEMPEST

The IBM EMR and EMR II Keyboards were the final variant of the Model F/XT, featuring different cables and connectors and shielding around the internal logic board. These keyboards were designed to be compliant with the shielding specification of codename TEMPEST, a NATO-recognised U.S. National Security Agency specification regarding methods of spying and protecting against spying with electronic equipment. In particular, these keyboards were designed to not radiate electromagnetic emanations to counter Van Eck phreaking.

Model M Typewriter Keyboard Assembly

Shorthand: M Typewriter

The 1984-debuting IBM Wheelwriters 3 and 5 and IBM Quietwriter 7 were the first vessels for membrane buckling spring keyboard assemblies. Unlike the Model F's limited typewriter adoption, what would become the Model M would be featured on IBM and Lexmark Wheelwriters until their discontinuation in 1993. IBM Wheelwriter layouts were vaguely PC-like, with a mix of T-nav arrow keys, one or two columns of left-side function keys, and occasionally even a numerical keypad being found on various models depending on their market segment. The common feature amongst all of them was a split spacebar, with the smaller "Code" key being an additional modifier for accessing functions throughout the keyboard.

Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: M

Form factor: Full-size

The 102-key Model M terminal keyboards were the first introduction of the standard Model M design. Used on various IBM terminals such as the IBM 3151 and 3161 ASCII Display Station and IBM 3471 and 3472 InfoWindow Display Station, these keyboards were the first taste of what would become the IBM Enhanced Keyboard. Common features included lack of any lock-lights, 240-degree DIN or RJ-45 connectors, and a modified ANSI-like design with the 102nd key found on the numeric keypad.

Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced Industrial Keyboard

Shorthand: M Industrial

Form factor: Full-size

The Model M industrial keyboards were the first PC-compatible Model Ms available, originally shipping with the IBM 7531 Industrial PC. Compared to the more famous and common IBM Enhanced Keyboard, IBM industrial keyboards feature a grey casing designed to hide the dirt and discolouration expected to be inflicted upon the device within an industrial environment. However, the internal assembly is unchanged. Thanks to their colour and relative rarity, these are amongst the most expensive Model Ms to purchase today.

Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Enhanced PC Keyboard

Shorthand: M

Form factor: Full-size

The Enhanced Keyboard was the first home consumer and most common Model M keyboard, becoming IBM's choice keyboard for a decade after its release and still in production today as the Unicomp Classic. Labelled as being "enhanced" in regards to its layout that became an industry standard and still used today with the addition of GUI keys, the Model M is perhaps the most well-known keyboard of all time thanks to the success of the Enhanced Keyboard and its main host system - the IBM Personal System/2 series. The Enhanced Keyboard was also made available for IBM's earlier "classic" Personal Computer series in both XT and AT flavours, and several other distinct variants exist for other types of systems and custom orders from third-party companies such Dell and Sabre.

Model M ANPOS Keyboard

Variant of a Model M ANPOS Keyboard

Shorthand: M/AT ANPOS

The IBM 4683/4684 Alphanumeric POS Keyboard was the first truly unique Model M keyboard variant launched. The host POS computer was IBM PC/AT based (in fact, it was IBM's first PC-based POS system), thus the keyboard itself has a PC/AT layout complete with a single-unit backspace and enlarged enter key, making a Model M/AT if you will.

Model M Type I Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model M Type I Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type I

Form factor: 120%

The usefulness of the 122-key "battleship" resulted in several Model M versions of the design, with this being the first. The Type I was a largely internal rework, swapping out the capacitive assembly for a membrane one and changing the bottom panel from metal to plastic. The rest of the design remained the same, including the dual-setting feet, and the top casing is fully compatible between the Model F and Model M versions. Like the F122 it replaced, the 24-key function key block was labelled either "Cmdxx" or "PFxx", with the most well-known host terminal being the IBM 3179 Color Display Station. These are also commonly referred to as the "M122" (although the later redesigns are also referred to as such), and thus "Type I" is used to help distinguish it from the others.

Model M Type II Functional Key Keyboard "Battleship"

Variant of a Model M Type II Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type II

Form factor: 120%

The Functional Key Keyboard Type II was a slight revision over the previous version made only months after the Type I's introduction. Whilst the general appearance remained the same, the dual-setting feet were lost in favour of an elongated version of the standard Enhanced Keyboard feet and DIP switches became an optional feature. The 24-key function key block was still labelled either "Cmdxx" or "PFxx". These are also commonly referred to as the "M122" like the other Model M Functional Key Keyboards, and thus "Type II" is used to help distinguish it from the others (in particular, from its very similar predecessor).

Model M Enhanced Keyboard with Speaker

Variant of a Model M Enhanced Keyboard with Speaker

Shorthand: M w/ Speaker

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM RISC System/6000 Keyboard was a variant of the Enhanced Keyboard featuring an integrated speaker on the bottom side of the casing. The speaker is believed to act as an audible cue when keys are pressed, similar to the purpose of solenoids in some earlier Beam spring and Model F keyboards. The speaker connects via a usually unused pin in the PS/2 plug, thus the speaker cannot be used on other systems without intercepting the signal with an additional separate circuit.

Model M Space Saving Keyboard "SSK"

Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Space Saving Keyboard

Shorthand: M/SSK

Form factor: Tenkeyless

These space-saving keyboards were the tenkeyless and compact versions of the IBM Enhanced Keyboard. The original IBM Space Saving Keyboard (SSK) was only available as a non-standard option for the IBM Personal System/2 series, resulting in a relative rarity as numeric keypads were viewed more favourably during the late '80s and '90s. The keyboard is also occasionally referred to as a Model M Mini. A modernised variant entered production in Q2 2020 as the Unicomp Tenkeyless, now featuring a USB modular cable and lock-lights.

Model M Keypad

Variant of a Model M Keypad

Shorthand: M

The IBM Screen Reader/2 Keypad was the peripheral component of the IBM Screen Reader/2, the first GUI-based screen reader designed to help people with hard or lack of sight access a PC running IBM Operating System/2, PC-DOS/MS-DOS, or Microsoft Windows. It takes the form of small Model M that resembles a numeric keypad, featuring ten numeric keys, an asterisk key, a number sign help, and two two-unit vertical keys reading "HELP" and "STOP". The internal assembly takes several production values from Model F designs with individual barrels, foam padding, and no plastic rivets holding the assembly together.

Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard "Battlecruiser"

Variant of a Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Type III Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type III

Form factor: 120%

The Functional Key Keyboard Type III was a major overhaul over the previous Type I and Type II designs. Bringing the design language closer to that of an IBM Enhanced Keyboard, the Type III was slightly smaller and lighter than its predecessors and almost completely did away with DIP switches. Whilst the protocol remained the same, the cable was swapped from 240-degree DIN to RJ-45 to suit its typical host machines - the IBM InfoWindow and InfoWindow II series display stations. The 24-key function key block was only ever labelled "Fxx" in contrast to the previous iterations. These are also commonly referred to as the "M122" like the other Model M Functional Key Keyboards, and thus "Type III" is used to help distinguish it from the others.

Model M Functional Keypad "M50"

Variant of a Model M Functional Keypad
Variant of a Model M Functional Keypad

Shorthand: M50

Form factor: 50% matrix

The 50-key Model M keyboards were designed for use with emulating IBM 4700 Finance Communication System applications on IBM Personal System/2 and later systems. As such, they possessed the same layout as the Model F-based IBM Model 100 keypads and came with either transparent keycaps or alphameric legends with a numeric keypad overlaying some of the keys via toggle. The alphameric version is the smallest usable Model M keyboard with a rough 50% ortholinear layout. The internal assembly also takes several production values from Model F designs with individual barrels, foam padding, and no plastic rivets holding the assembly together.

Model M Industrial Space Saving Keyboard "SSK"

Variant of a Model M Industrial Space Saving Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Industrial Space Saving Keyboard

Shorthand: M/SSK Industrial

Form factor: Tenkeyless

The IBM Industrial Space Saving Keyboard was a variant of the IBM Space Saving Keyboard designed for blending in with industrial environments - in particular, heavily within the automotive industry. In a familiar fashion to the relationship between the IBM Enhanced Keyboard and IBM Industrial PC Keyboard, the only difference is the grey casing designed to hide the dirt and discolouration expected to be inflicted upon the device within an industrial environment. Like the full-sized industrial keyboards, these are usually sold at a significant premium.

Model M Type IV PC Functional Key Keyboard "Battlecruiser"

Variant of a Model M Type IV PC Functional Key Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Type IV PC Functional Key Keyboard

Shorthand: M122 Type IV PC

Form factor: 120%

The IBM Personal System/2 Host Connected Keyboard is a variant of the Type III IBM Functional Key Keyboard designed to be natively compatible with PCs. As such, these are the only IBM "battleship" or "battlecruiser" keyboards that come with modular SDL connectors and lock-lights as standard.

Model M1 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Variant of a Model M1 Selectric Touch Keyboard
Variant of a Model M1 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Shorthand: M1

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Model M1 was one of two variants of the lightweight and full-sized Selectric Touch Keyboard launched at the same time. The Model M1 was sold under the Options by IBM brand as an individual keyboard for any PS/2 compatible systems. The internal design is significantly different from that of a standard Model M, with no metal backplate, an integrated front cover and barrel plate, and a completely different logic board featuring surface-mounted components.

Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Variant of a Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard
Variant of a Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard

Shorthand: M2

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Model M2 was one of two variants of the lightweight and full-sized Selectric Touch Keyboard launched at the same time. The Model M2 was bundled with IBM's Personal System/1 series of home computers. The internal design is significantly different from that of a standard Model M, with no metal backplate, an integrated front cover and barrel plate, and a completely different logic board featuring surface-mounted components.

Model M2 Terminal Keyboard

Variant of a Model M2 Terminal Keyboard
Variant of a Model M2 Terminal Keyboard

Shorthand: M2

Form factor: Full-size

The terminal variant of the Model M2 was designed exclusively for the IBM 3153 InfoWindow II Color ASCII Display Station. The keyboard is functionally identical to a standard Selectric Touch Keyboard, except the PS/2 connector is swapped for a RJ-25 jack.

Model M2 Selectric Touch Keyboard with Border

Shorthand: M2

Form factor: Full-size

The bordered variant of the Model M2 was a Quiet Touch rubber dome-only keyboard designed to mimic the footprint of an IBM Enhanced Keyboard. The frame that provides the border has no technical purpose and the rest of the keyboard is the same as a standard Model M2.

Model M3 L40SX Keyboard

Shorthand: M3

Model M3 Numeric Keypad

Variant of a Model M3 Numeric Keypad

Shorthand: M3

Form factor: Tenkey

The Model M3 numeric keypad was an optional attachment for the IBM Personal System/2 L40SX laptop. It was notable for being the first individually-distinct device with IBM's buckling sleeves switches. The keypad also sports a pass-through socket for a PS/2 compatible mouse.

Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard

Variant of a Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4 Space Saver Keyboard

Shorthand: M4

The IBM Space Saver Keyboard was the first detached alphanumeric buckling sleeves keyboard from the company. Not to be confused with the IBM Space Saving Keyboard (SSK), the Model M4 was a detached desktop adaptation of the IBM Personal System/2 L40SX's integrated Model M3 keyboard.

Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard

Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver TrackPoint II Keyboard

Shorthand: M4-1

The IBM Space Saver Keyboard with TrackPoint II was a variant of the original Model M4 that featured an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick. The Model M4-1 is notable for being the first IBM desktop keyboard to feature TrackPoint technology and the only Model M to retain a strain gauge-based pointing stick after Unicomp took over production.

Model M4-1 Space Saver Numeric Keypad

Variant of a Model M4-1 Space Saver Numeric Keypad

Shorthand: M4-1

Form factor: Tenkey

The Model M4-1 numeric keypad was an optional coupling for the IBM Space Saver Keyboard (with or without TrackPoint II). It's essentially the same as the Model M3 numeric keypad except in a larger case, and the keypad connected via coupling to a Model M4 or M4-1 keyboard via an RJ-45 jack.

Model M5-1 Trackball Keyboard

Shorthand: M5-1

Form factor: Full-size

The 16mm IBM Trackball Keyboard is the first of two variants of the IBM's trackball-integrated Enhanced Keyboard variants. The Model M5-1 is by far the rarer of the two, which placed a 16mm trackball above the arrow keys along with four mouse buttons (two for left and right click and two for left and right stepped-click).

Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard

Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard
Variant of a Model M5-2 Trackball Keyboard

Shorthand: M5-2

Form factor: Full-size

The 25mm IBM Trackball Keyboard is the second of two variants of the IBM's trackball-integrated Enhanced Keyboard variants. The Model M5-2 contrasts the Model M5-1 in being far more common and housing the trackball module in its own assembly on the top-right corner of the keyboard. The module also has the four mouse keys repeated facing the behind the keyboard to accommodate users using their thumbs for the trackball. The Model M5-2 remains in production via Unicomp as the Classic Trackball keyboard (also previously called "On-The-Ball").

Model M5-2/M13 Hybrid Keyboard

Variant of a Model M5-2/M13 Hybrid Keyboard

Shorthand: M5-2 / M13

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp On-The-Ball Plus was a specialised combined variant of the Model M5-2 and Model M13 keyboard designs that sold for only a short time. The trackball module was the same 25mm module always used on Model M5-2s, however, the pointing stick was Unicomp's own force-sensitive resistor implementation like Unicomp-era On-The-Point Model M13s.

Model M6/ThinkPad Keyboard

Shorthand: M6/ThinkPad

The ThinkPad keyboards were a variant of the Model M4 buckling sleeves-based keyboard in a further reduced form factor. Produced by Lexmark, the original Model M6 was only available on early ThinkPads that did not have a TrackPoint pointing stick that would later come to define the ThinkPad style.

Model M6-1/ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard

Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard

Shorthand: M6-1/ThinkPad

The Model M6-1 was the TrackPoint equipped variant of the Model M6 used throughout the mid-'90s as the standard ThinkPad keyboard. The quality and utility of the Model M6-1 were regarded as a significant factor in the ThinkPad's market success. Whilst initially produced by Lexmark and Key Tronic as a buckling sleeves keyboard, the Model M6-1 was later substituted by scissor-stabilised rubber dome assemblies produced by Acer, Alps, LITE-ON and NMB. These Model M6-1s mostly came with TrackPoint II or III sticks, with some later ones receiving TrackPoint IV with a dedicated scroll button.

Model M6-1/ThinkPad Numeric Keypad

Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad Numeric Keypad

Shorthand: M6-1/ThinkPad

Form factor: Tenkey

No ThinkPad from the '90s had an integrated numeric keypad due to size limitations, thus a dedicated external option was a popular choice. IBM made several numeric keypads based on the same scissor-stabilised mechanisms used on later Model M6-1 keyboards largely produced by Alps for IBM.

Model M6-1/ThinkPad UltraNav Keyboard

Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad UltraNav Keyboard
Variant of a Model M6-1/ThinkPad UltraNav Keyboard

Shorthand: M6-1/ThinkPad

The Model M6-1 UltraNav keyboards were an extension of the standard Model M6-1 keyboard that included a trackpad and only used TrackPoint IV. Keyboards such as the IBM SK-8835, SK-8840, and SK-8845 were also the first desktop implementations of a ThinkPad keyboard. Integrated examples of these UltraNav keyboards were largely produced by either Alps or NMB, with desktop keyboards exclusively produced by LITE-ON.

Model M7 POS Keypad

Variant of a Model M7 POS Keypad

Shorthand: M7

The IBM Retail POS Keyboard (later Toshiba POS System Keyboard) was one of five Model M POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993. The Model M7 keypad was the smallest out of the bunch and the only one lacking a magnetic stripe reader by default. In its default layout, the keypad has 50 keys of which 49 are usable, and the middle bank has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two switches. The single key on its own serves as a dedicated Ctrl key. The other slightly larger keys are designed to be programmable and thus have transparent keytops.

Model M7 POS MSR Keypad

Variant of a Model M7 POS MSR Keypad

Shorthand: M7/MSR

The IBM Retail POS Keyboard w/ Card Reader (later Toshiba POS System Keyboard w/ Card Reader) was one of five Model M POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993. As the name suggests, this is a variant of the standard Model M7 that includes a magnetic stripe reader (MSR). In its default layout, the keypad has 50 keys of which 49 are usable, and the middle bank has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two switches. The single key on its own serves as a dedicated Ctrl key. The other slightly larger keys are designed to be programmable and thus have transparent keytops.

Model M8 POS LCD MSR Keypad

Variant of a Model M8 POS LCD MSR Keypad

Shorthand: M8

The IBM Retail POS Keyboard /w Card Reader and Display was one of five Model M POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993. The Model M8 is essentially an enlarged Model M7 keypad with an added LCD tilt-adjustable LCD panel in the top-left corner and no option to have it without a magnetic stripe reader. In its default layout, the keypad has 50 keys of which 49 are usable, and the middle bank has a numeric keypad made up of single-unit keys with the zero key taking up two switches. The single key on its own serves as a dedicated Ctrl key. The other slightly larger keys are designed to be programmable and thus have transparent keytops.

Model M9 ANPOS MSR Keyboard

Variant of a Model M9 ANPOS MSR Keyboard

Shorthand: M9

The IBM Retail ANPOS Keyboard w/ Card Reader was one of five Model M POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993. The Model M9 is an ISO-only alphanumeric POS (ANPOS) keyboard with a magnetic stripe reader. Besides the alphanumeric block, the only set layout on this keyboard is the numeric keypad on the far right of the keyboard. However, all other keycaps are relegendable and a full Enhanced Keyboard layout can be applied to the design.

Model M11 POS MSR Key Array

Variant of a Model M11 POS MSR Key Array

Shorthand: M11

The IBM Modifiable Layout Keyboard was one of five Model M POS input devices introduced with the IBM 4694 POS Terminal in June 1993. The Model M11 is a variant of the Model M9 ANPOS MSR Keyboard entirely constructed of single-unit relegendable keycaps excluding the dedicated numeric keypad on the right side of the keyboard and the Ctrl key located on the top-left most key. The M11 can be configured for entirely functional use or as an ortholinear alphanumeric keyboard.

Model M-e POS Keypad

Shorthand: M-e

The Model M extended family (M-e) POS keypads are non-alphanumeric derivatives of the Model M7, M8, M9 and M11 family that lack official designations but are clearly of similar design using the same POS rubber dome switches. All examples known are smaller than the 49-key Model M7 and are typically found as clip-on extensions for IBM and later Toshiba POS systems' monitors.

Model M-e ANPOS Keyboard

Shorthand: M-e

The Model M extended family (M-e) ANPOS keyboards are alphanumeric derivatives of the Model M7, M8, M9 and M11 family that lack official designations but are clearly of similar design using the same POS rubber dome switches.

Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard

Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 TrackPoint II Keyboard

Shorthand: M13

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Enhanced Keyboard with TrackPoint II (or simply IBM TrackPoint II Keyboard) was a variant of the IBM Enhanced Keyboard with an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick. Also branded as the Lexmark Classic Touch Keyboard with Pointing Stick, the Model M13 is perhaps the most famous standard Model M variant with the most useful integrated pointing device. Production for the Model M13 was largely handled by Maxi Switch for both the standard beige and the more infamous black versions, with Lexmark only making some beige ones and all of the rarer Erase-Eaze split-spacebar version. Model M13s had several distinctive features, including noticeably stronger chassis case texturing, PS/2 pass-through port for mice on the back, and the use of pad-printed legends for the black variant due to the contrast limitations of dye-sublimation.

Model M13 Industrial Pointing Stick Keyboard

Variant of a Model M13 Industrial Pointing Stick Keyboard

Shorthand: M13 Industrial

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM Industrial Keyboard with Pointing Stick was a variant of the standard Model M13 designed for blending in with industrial environments. In a familiar fashion with other Model Ms that had an industrial version, the main difference is the grey casing designed to hide the dirt and discolouration expected to be inflicted upon the device within an industrial environment. These were first produced for IBM by Maxi Switch featuring TrackPoint II pointing sticks, but were also later produced for IBM by Unicomp and came with Unicomp Pointing Sticks instead.

Model M13 Pointing Stick Keyboard

Variant of a Model M13 Pointing Stick Keyboard
Variant of a Model M13 Pointing Stick Keyboard

Shorthand: M13

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp On-The-Stick was the continuation of Model M13 production after Lexmark finished producing Model M keyboards. The chassis is based on the Lexmark-produced moulds, however, Unicomp replaced TrackPoint II with their own force-sensitive resistor based Pointing Stick. Other changes included improved tactile mouse buttons and the removal of the PS/2 mouse pass-through port. The On-The-Stick exited production around 2009.

Model M15 Adjustable Keyboard

Shorthand: M15

Form factor: Ergo tenkeyless

The IBM Adjustable Keyboard and Lexmark Select-Ease Keyboard were tenkeyless ergonomic keyboards based on the Model M1/M2 design, possibly being the last IBM-sanctioned Model M design. As such, they were the final form of the Model M in its classic era, being the unique last model introduced before Lexmark stopped Model M production. Being the only ergonomic keyboard as per today's standards that IBM ever marketed, the Model M15 features a high degree of customisability, including split, tilt, swivel and tenting capabilities. For convenience, the arrow keys are duplicated on both halves of the keyboard and the split spacebar has the Erase-Eaze feature. Model M15s are quite rare and sell handsome at auction, with many considering these to be the holy grail of the Model Ms.

Model M15 Numeric Keypad

Shorthand: M15

Form factor: Tenkey

Model M Ultra TrackPoint II Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Ultra TrackPoint II Keyboard

Shorthand: M

Form factor: Full-size

The IBM 5576-C01 Keyboard was a unique compact profile full-sized Model M offshoot featuring an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick. It was designed for the IBM PS/55E, an all-in-one PC exclusively sold in Japan. Whilst most of IBM of Japan's infamous keyboards were produced by Alps Electric or Brother, this was one of the few (if not the only one) produced by Lexmark in the US for Japan and the only one to be buckling springs based but not use Brother buckling springs.

Model M Ultra Pointing Stick Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Ultra Pointing Stick Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Ultra Pointing Stick Keyboard

Shorthand: M/EP

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp EnduraPro is a compact profile full-sized Model M made using recycled IBM 5576-C01 Keyboard moulds. Introduced around the turn of the Millenium, the EnduraPro continues to be Unicomp's main and currently only pointing stick keyboard. Mirroring the transition between the Model M13 and Unicomp On-The-Stick keyboards, the EnduraPro features a Unicomp Pointing Stick instead of the TrackPoint II that originally shipped with its predecessor.

Model M Ultra Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Ultra Keyboard
Variant of a Model M Ultra Keyboard

Shorthand: M/UC

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp Ultra Classic is a compact profile full-sized Model M made using recycled IBM 5576-C01 Keyboard moulds. It is a sibling of the Unicomp EnduraPro, introduced sometime after it and lacking its characteristic the pointing stick and mouse buttons. It is marketed as a slimmer version of the traditional Model M and will eventually be succeeded in that market segment by the Unicomp New Model M.

Model M Enhanced ANPOS Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Enhanced ANPOS Keyboard

Shorthand: MPOS

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp Point of Sale with Magnetic Stripe Reader is simply a modified Unicomp Classic keyboard for retail use. It has the distinction of being the only buckling springs keyboard equipped with magnetic stripe reader, making it one of the more notable unique Model Ms Unicomp introduced themselves.

Model M Space Saving Full-Sized Keyboard

Variant of a Model M Space Saving Full-Sized Keyboard

Shorthand: M

Form factor: Full-size

The Unicomp New Model M is the first new Model M design in almost twenty years. Built as a full-sized version of the IBM Space Saving Keyboard design, the New Model M will eventually succeed the Ultra Classic series as the standard low-profile Model M.

TrackPoint-Equipped Keyboard

Shorthand: TPFS

Form factor: Full-size

TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard

Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard
Variant of a TrackPoint-Equipped Compact Keyboard

Shorthand: TPSS

Form factor: Tenkeyless

AccuType ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard

Shorthand: AccuType

The AccuType ThinkPad Keyboard was Lenovo's replacement to the long line of classic Model M6/M6-1 derived keyboard designs introduced in 2011 with Lenovo ThinkPad X1 and deployed as the sole ThinkPads keyboard design the following year. The AccuType's keytops are wider than before and the switches have reduced key travel, but they still largely resemble the feel of previous classic ThinkPad keyboards. All standard versions feature a TrackPoint IV pointing stick.

AccuType ThinkPad Optical Trackpoint Keyboard

Shorthand: AccuType

The Optical TrackPoint variant of the AccuType ThinkPad Keyboard was a slightly condensed and reduced key travel version of the standard AccuType keyboard used specifically by 2011's Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet Keyboard Folio Case and 2013's Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2 Bluetooth Keyboard with Stand. This variant was relatively not well received, thus the design was abandoned after the 2013 keyboard exited production.