Keyboard Directory

Notice 2024-03-01

The ASK Keyboard Directory is still a work in progress. Whilst it has been improved greatly over 2022 and 2023, there is still much work to be done over 2024. So please excuse missing descriptions and obvious missing keyboards.

The Keyboard Directory is an exhaustive illustrated list of IBM and family keyboards with basic information and common (usually Americas, EMEA and Japan) part numbers given and usually link on where to find out more. Originally envisioned as a Yellow Pages for keyboards (if you will), the Keyboard Directory intends to build a complete picture of the IBM and family keyboard timeline for people new to such keyboards to see and get a feel for or simply provide viewing pleasure. 250 distinct keyboards are listed in the directory.

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Early typewriters, keyboards & input devices

Hollerith 001 Mechanical Card Punch

Royal Astronomical Society

Aka, IBM 001 Mechanical Card Punch

First patented in 1901, the Hollerith/IBM 001 was the first keypunch (ie, first card punch that operated from keyboard input of some kind).

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IBM 011 Electric Card Punch

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The first electric keypunch, where cards are punched by electromagnets instead of musclepower.

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IBM 012 Electric Duplicating Card Punch

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The first IBM keypunch capable of duplicating columns from one card to another.

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IBM 015 Motor Driven Electric Card Punch

IBM (used under fair dealing)

IBM's first keypunch with automatic feeding and ejecting mechanisms.

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IBM 016 Motor Driven Electric Duplicating Card Punch

W.J.Eckert (used under fair dealing)

IBM's first duplicating keypunch with automatic feeding and ejecting mechanisms.

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IBM Radiotype Transmissing Typewriter

www.columbia.edu

A modified IBM Electric Typewriter Model 01 equipped with an attached transmitter that could communicate with a remote Radiotype via radio or wire, outputting keystrokes via a keyboardless receiving typewriter.

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IBM 032 Alphabetical Printing Card Punch

Columbia University (used under fair dealing)

IBM's first keypunch capable of alphanumeric punching and printing the character typed on top of the punched card.

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IBM 031 Alphabetical Duplicating Card Punch

Computer History Museum (used under fair dealing)

A duplicating IBM keypunch with numeric keypad known to be used in statistical and astronomical applications.

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IBM 040 Tape Controlled Card Punch

IBM (used under fair dealing)

An IBM keypunch capable of converting the code of paper tape to punched cards and used extensively during World War II by the U.S. Military.

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IBM 797 Documenting Numbering Punch

IBM (used under fair dealing)

A special keypunch for numbering documents and believed to be used for Canadian censuses.

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Card Punch keyboards

IBM 024/026/056 Card Punch Combination Keyboard

B. Franske (GFDL 1.2 or later)

The 45-key alphanumeric keyboard for IBM 024 and 026 Card Punches and IBM 056 Card Verifier, electrically separable and thus the common ancestor to all modern IBM keyboards.

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IBM 024/026/056 Card Punch Numeric Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The 21-key numeric keypad for IBM 024 and 026 Card Punches and IBM 056 Card Verifier.

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Typewriter printer-keyboards

IBM 7150 Console Typewriter & Operating Keyboard

A. S. Jackson (CC with attribution)

The multi-purpose input/output component for the IBM 7070 Data Processing System. It was amongst the earliest known printer-keyboards and comprised of two separate input devices within one housing - the Console Typewriter and the Operating Keyboard.

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IBM 7900 Inquiry Station Typewriter Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The querying input/output component for the IBM 7070 Data Processing System. It was amongst the earliest known printer-keyboards.

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IBM 1052 I/O Printer-Keyboard

ComputerGeek7066 (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Aka, IBM 1052a or IBM 1052-6

An IBM 024/026 keypunch keyboard paired with a Selectric-based printing mechanism used as part of the IBM 1050 Data Communications System, which connected to other 1050s or IBM 1400, 7000 or System/360 computers. It featured one bank of 1x4 buttons and 3 toggle switches.

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IBM 1816 Printer-Keyboard

Heikkonen (donated photo)

An IBM 024/026 keypunch keyboard paired with a Selectric-based printing mechanism used as part of the IBM 1800 Data Acquisition and Control System.

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IBM 1052-7 I/O Printer-Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

A variant of the IBM 1052 intended specifically for IBM 2150 Consoles. It featured one bank of 1x4 buttons and 19 toggle switches.

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IBM 1130 Computing System Console Keyboard

Martin Skøtt (CC BY-SA 2.0)

An IBM 029 keypunch keyboard paired with a Selectric-based IBM 1053 Console Printer used as part of the IBM 1130 Computing System, a then low-cost computer for price-sensitive computing-intensive technical markets like education and engineering.

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IBM 2740 Communications Terminal Model 1

IBM (used under fair dealing)

Aka, IBM 2740-1

A Selectric-based IBM 72 I/O Typewriter modified with SLT electronics. It could communicate with other terminals or a computer such as an IBM System/360. 2740-1 is the non-buffered version of this terminal.

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IBM 2740 Communications Terminal Model 2

IBM (used under fair dealing)

Aka, IBM 2740-2

A Selectric-based IBM 72 I/O Typewriter modified with SLT electronics. It could communicate with other terminals or a computer such as an IBM System/360. 2740-2 is the buffered version of this terminal that could store up to 120 characters and print them for verification before transmission.

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IBM 2741 Communications Terminal

CC BY-SA 4.0

A Selectric-based IBM 72 I/O Typewriter modified with SLT electronics. It has a RS-232-C serial interface to connect to IBM System/360 computers.

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IBM 5471 Printer-Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The IBM 5471 was a printer-keyboard available for IBM System/3 computers with an IBM 5444 Disk Storage Drive attached. It was designed to perform online inquiries, key entry of data, operator/system communications and operate as a secondary printer.

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IBM 3210 Console Printer-Keyboard Model 1

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The table-mounted variant of the 3210 auxiliary I/O terminal for IBM System/370 computers, sporting a Selectric I/O-II printer and capable of altering and displaying data in storage directly from the System/370 CPU.

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IBM 3210 Console Printer-Keyboard Model 2

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The pedestal-mounted variant of the 3210 auxiliary I/O terminal for IBM System/370 computers, sporting a Selectric I/O-II printer and not capable of altering and displaying data in storage directly from the System/370 CPU (requiring an external signal cable instead).

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IBM 3215 Console Printer-Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

A table-mounted auxiliary I/O terminal for IBM System/370 computers intended as the faster option to the 3210s thanks to 3215's use of a 7x7 dot printer instead of a Selectric-based print mechanism.

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IBM 3793 Printer-Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

A Selectric I/O II printer-keyboard for the IBM 3790 Communications System. It was a data entry operator station that also included various control keys, operator guidance indicators and system indicators.

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Elastic Diaphragm keyboards

IBM 2772 Multi-Purpose Control Unit Keyboard

Computer History Archives Project (used under fair dealing)

The IBM 2772 and its keyboard were used with the IBM 2770 Data Communication System. The keyboard unit was used for data entry and controlling the system.

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IBM 5475 Data Entry Keyboard Attachment

Henk Stegeman (used under fair dealing)

The IBM 5475 was a 64-character keyboard with several toggle switches available for IBM System/3 computers.

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IBM 5496 Data Recorder Keyboard

Museo Scienza Tecnologia Milano (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The IBM 5496 was a 64-character keyboard available for IBM System/3 computers as part of its Data Recorder system used to provide punched and printed source documents for the host computer.

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IBM 5404/5406 System/3 Operator Keyboard Console

Glenn's Computer Museum (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

The IBM System/3 Operator Keyboard Console was largest keyboard available for any IBM System/3 config. It was used for entering data into storage, controlling system functions and controlling certain program operations and printer operations via its command keys.

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IBM 3672 Executive Console

JP! (used under fair dealing)

The 178-key keyboard component of the IBM 3670 Brokerage Communications System.

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"Model A" keyboards

IBM 3275/3277 Display Station Type A 66-key Typewriter Keyboard

snuci (public domain)

eg, P/Ns 2621364, 2621367

The original Micro Switch-made 66-key [data] typewriter keyboard for the IBM 3275 and 3277 Display Stations.

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Model B keyboards

IBM 3158 66-key Display Console Keyboard

うぃき野郎 (CC BY-SA 4.0 (cropped))

IBM-made 66-key operator console keyboard for the IBM System/370 Model 158 mainframe computer's 3158 Display Console (also known as the 3158 Operator Console). It was integrated into the large platform the console's CRT display was attached to. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and a red "STOP" key "IRPT" (interrupt) keys. It's also the earliest known IBM Model B (beam spring key-switch) based keyboard.

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IBM 3115/3125 Operator Console Keyboard

C. Corti @ Universität Stuttgart (permission to use requested and given)

IBM-made 66-key operator console keyboard for the IBM System/370 Models 115 and 125 mainframe computers' 3115 and 3125 (respectively) Operator Consoles. It was partially integrated to the base of the console's CRT display. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and a red "STOP" key, and an Operator Control Panel (OCP) with buttons for powering the host system on and off, performing low-level was detected, and an emergency pull to cut power to the host system immediately. There were two versions of 3115/3125 keyboard, and this was the original one with relatively thick side bezels.

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IBM 3275/3277 Display Station Type B 66-key Typewriter Keyboard

TheMK (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

The revised IBM-made 66-key [data] typewriter keyboard for the IBM 3275 and 3277 Display Stations.

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IBM 3275/3277 Display Station Type B 78-key Typewriter Keyboard

Spitzak (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The revised IBM-made 78-key [data] typewriter keyboard for the IBM 3275 and 3277 Display Stations.

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IBM 3604 Keyboard Display Alphanumeric Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The larger alphanumeric keyboard for the IBM 3604 Keyboard Display.

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IBM 3604 Keyboard Display Numeric/Data Entry Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

The smaller numeric and data entry keyboard for the IBM 3604 Keyboard Display.

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IBM 3115/3125 Revised Operator Console Keyboard

Agencja Fotograficzna Caro (rights to use photo purchased from Alamy (website license))

IBM-made 66-key operator console keyboard for the IBM System/370 Models 115 and 125 mainframe computers' 3115 and 3125 (respectively) Operator Consoles. It was partially integrated to the base of the console's CRT display. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and red "STOP" and "IRPT" keys, and an Operator Control Panel (OCP) with buttons for powering the host system on and off, performing low-level was detected, and an emergency pull to cut power to the host system immediately. There were two versions of 3115/3125 keyboard, and this was the revised one with relatively thin side bezels.

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IBM 5320 System/32 Keyboard Assembly

Glenn's Computer Museum (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

The integrated keyboard assembly of the IBM 5320 System/32 midrange computer.

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IBM 3138/3148 78-key Display Console Keyboard

STOCKFOLIO 656 (rights to use photo purchased from Alamy (website license))

IBM-made 78-key operator console keyboard for the IBM System/370 Models 138 and 148 mainframe computers' 3138 and 3148 (respectively) Display Consoles. It was integrated into the large platform the console's CRT display was attached to. It's essentially a version of the IBM 3158 66-key Display Console Keyboard but with the added 12-key program function keypad. Unusually for an IBM operator console keyboard since 1972, it didn't have coloured "START" and "STOP" keys.

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IBM 5251/5252 Display Station Data Entry Keyboard

kuato (used under fair dealing)

IBM-made 66-key (most) or 69-key (Katakana) data entry keyboard for the IBM 5251 Display Station and 5252 Dual Display Station, the inaugural terminals of the IBM 5250 family for IBM's midrange computers. The keyboard is a lot less common than its [83-key typewriter counterpart](directory?id=FEfWft6N) and uses a layout similar to IBM Card Punch keyboards. They had an internal solenoid clicker assembly and a cut-out above the keys to hold a template for writing down the names of functions assigned to various keys. They had a short, grey cable terminating in a female DB-25 plug.

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IBM 5251/5252 Display Station Typewriter Keyboard

Museo de Informática (CC BY-SA 3.0)

IBM-made 83-key (most) or 85-key (Katakana and Hebrew) typewriter keyboard for the IBM 5251 Display Station and 5252 Dual Display Station, the inaugural terminals of the IBM 5250 family for IBM's midrange computers. The keyboard is a lot more common than its [66-key data entry counterpart](directory?id=FEfWft6N) and introduced the 5250-style typewriter physical and functional keyboard layouts that would later prove influential for future terminal and early IBM PC keyboards. They had an internal solenoid clicker assembly and a cut-out above the keys to hold a template for writing down the names of functions assigned to various keys. They had a short, grey cable terminating in a female DB-25 plug.

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IBM 3036 Dual Console Keyboard

NASA (public domain)

IBM-made 66-key operator console keyboard for the System/370-compatible IBM 303X Attached Processor Complex series' 3036 Dual Console. The 3036 consisted of two display consoles with separate keyboards attached on a right-angled deck. It resembled the IBM 3115/3125 Operator Console Keyboards but lacking their Operator Console Panels with additional controls. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and red "STOP" and "IRPT" keys.

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IBM 3251/3276/3278/3279/8775 Display Station 75-key Data Entry Keyboard

daedalus (permission to use given)

eg, P/Ns 1742710, 4941907, 4941915, 4941917, 4941919, 4941921, 4941923, 4941927, 4941929, 4941931, 4941935, 4941937, 4941939

IBM-made 75-key (most) or 76-key (Japan) data entry keyboard for primarily the IBM 3276 Control Unit Display Station, 3278 Display Station and 3279 Color Display Station, but was also used with the IBM 3251 Display Station and 8775 Display Terminal. This variant is the "data entry 1" version and has a numeric lock.

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IBM 3251/3276/3278/3279/8775 Display Station 75-key Typewriter Keyboard

themk (CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 4941777, 4941783, 4941807, 4941813, 4941819, 4941825, 4941831, 4941835, 4941847, 4941853, 4941859, 4941871, 4941877

IBM-made 75-key (most) or 76-key (Japan) [data] typewriter keyboard for primarily the IBM 3276 Control Unit Display Station, 3278 Display Station and 3279 Color Display Station, but was also used with the IBM 3251 Display Station and 8775 Display Terminal. This variant doesn't have a numeric lock.

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IBM 4978 Display Station Basic Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

RPQ D02057

D02057 RPQ keyboard option for IBM 4978s with 81 keys including a 11-key numeric keypad for "adding machine" like operation and intended for data entry.

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IBM 3732 Text Display Station Typewriter Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

IBM-made 74-key (BAE enter and ANSI left shift) or 75-key (ISO) typewriter keyboard for the IBM 3730 Distributed Office Communication System's IBM 3732 Text Display Station, designed for word processing operations.

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IBM 3276/3278/3279 Display Station 87-key Attribute Select Typewriter Keyboard

raoulduke-esq (donated photo)

eg, P/Ns 4419251, 4419255, 4419259, 4419259, 4419263, 4419283, 4419291, 4419295, 4419299, 4419303, 4419307, 4419311, 4419327

IBM-made 87-key (most) or 88-key (Japan) [data] typewriter keyboard for IBM 3276 Control Unit Display Station, 3278 Display Station and 3279 Color Display Station. This variant is intended operating IBM 3270 extended attribute (all terminals) and colour (3279 only) support, and doesn't have a numeric lock.

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IBM 3276/3278/3279 Display Station 87-key Typewriter/APL Keyboard

mcmaxmcmc & muramasa (donated photo)

eg, P/Ns 1742718, 4941982, 4941984, 4941986, 4941987, 4941989, 4941990, 4941992, 4941993, 4941994, 4941996, 4941998

IBM-made 87-key (most) or 88-key (Japan) [data] typewriter keyboard for IBM 3276 Control Unit Display Station, 3278 Display Station and 3279 Color Display Station. This variant has APL sublegends and has a numeric lock.

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IBM 3278/3279 Display Console 75-key Operator Console Keyboard with Num. Lock

D. Fischer (CC BY-SA 3.0)

IBM 308X w/ SCCP

eg, P/N 4942247

IBM-made 75-key (most) or 76-key (Japanese) operator console keyboard for the IBM 3270 lineage IBM 3278 Model 2A Display Console and 3279 Model 2C Color Display Console, both possible consoles for the System/370 compatible IBM 3081 Processor Complex. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and a red "STOP" key. This version has an operator control panel one blank grey switch and blue "Lamp Test" and "IML" switches, and "PC Power" is prominently titled above 3 LEDs. The keyboard was additionally designated as a typewriter-style keyboard with "SCCP" (presumed to stand for "system console control panel", referring to this panel arrangement).

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IBM 3278/3279 Display Console 75-key Operator Console Keyboard without Num. Lock

photekq (donated photo)

IBM 43X1 w/o channel-to-channel

eg, P/Ns 4942001, 4942007, 4942010, 4942016, 4942022, 4942025, 4942028, 4942031, 4942034, 4942040, 4942043, 4942046, 4942052, 4942055, 4942058

IBM-made 75-key (most) or 76-key (Japanese) operator console keyboard for the IBM 3270 lineage IBM 3278 Model 2A Display Console and 3279 Model 2C Color Display Console, both consoles for the System/370 compatible IBM 4331, 4341, 4361 and 4381 Processors. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and a red "STOP" key. This version doesn't have the possible channel-to-channel feature.

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IBM 3278/3279 Display Console 75-key Operator Console Keyboard without Num. Lock

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

IBM 43X1 w/o channel-to-channel and power-on

eg, P/Ns 4942161, 4942163, 4942164, 4942166, 4942168, 4942169, 4942170, 4942171, 4942172, 4942174, 4942175, 4942176, 4942178, 4942179, 4942180

IBM-made 75-key (most) or 76-key (Japanese) operator console keyboard for the IBM 3270 lineage IBM 3278 Model 2A Display Console and 3279 Model 2C Color Display Console, both consoles for the System/370 compatible IBM 4331, 4341, 4361 and 4381 Processors. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and a red "STOP" key. This version doesn't have the possible channel-to-channel and power-on features.

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IBM 5924-T01 Multi-Shift Kanji Keyboard

Deutsches Museum (CC BY-SA 4.0)

A 254-key 12-shift kanji keyboard used by the IBM 3278 Model 52 Display Station and IBM 5924-T01 Kanji Keypunch components of IBM 3270 Kanji Information Display System.

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IBM 5253/5254 Display Station Electronic Keyboard

theMK (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

92-character variant

eg, P/N 7363830

IBM-made 82-key typewriter-style keyboard for the IBM 5253 Display Station and 5254 Dual Display Station (both terminals for the IBM 5520 Administrative System). They were intended for facilitating document creation and editing, and management of their storage. They could also support an IBM 3270 emulation mode. This variant is the 92-character keyboard with an ANSI-like 2.25-unit left shift key and a "BAE" (large backwards-L) style return key. They had a 32Ω, 0.2W speaker inside though its purpose is presently unclear. The keyboard itself and its layout became the basis of the slightly later IBM Displaywriter Keyboard.

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IBM 5253/5254 Display Station Electronic Keyboard

alexnperez (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

96-character variant

eg, P/N 7363831

IBM-made 84-key typewriter-style keyboard for the IBM 5253 Display Station and 5254 Dual Display Station (both terminals for the IBM 5520 Administrative System). They were intended for facilitating document creation and editing, and management of their storage. They could also support an IBM 3270 emulation mode. This variant is the 96-character keyboard with a 1.25-unit left shift key and an "ISO-style" return key. They had a 32Ω, 0.2W speaker inside though its purpose is presently unclear. The keyboard itself and its layout became the basis of the slightly later IBM Displaywriter Keyboard.

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IBM 5281/5282/5285/5286 Data Station Typewriter Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, "beamfoot"

IBM-made 83-key [data] typewriter keyboard for IBM 5281 Data Station, 5282 Dual Data Station, 5285 Programmable Data Station and 5286 Dual Programmable Data Station. It has a 32Ω, 0.2W speaker inside.

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IBM 6580 Displaywriter Display Station Type A Keyboard Module

Kuritakey (permission requested and explicitly given)

96-character variant

eg, P/N 2683230

IBM-made 84-key keyboard for IBM Displaywriter System's 6580 Display Station intended for word processing. The 84-key version had ISO-style left shift and return keys and was designed to support 96 characters.

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IBM 6580 Displaywriter Display Station Type A Keyboard Module

Mike Meredith/daedalus (permission requested and explicitly given)

92-character variant

IBM-made 82-key keyboard for IBM Displaywriter System's 6580 Display Station intended for word processing. The 82-key version had ANSI-style left shift and "BAE" backwards-L style return keys and was designed to support 92 characters.

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IBM 3276/3278 Display Station 75-key Data Entry Keyboard

HaaTa (permission to use given)

RPQ 8K0732

eg, P/N 1742714

IBM-made 76-key data entry keyboard for primarily the IBM 3276 Control Unit Display Station, 3278 Display Station and 3279 Color Display Station. This variant is RPQ 8K0732 and is a "data entry 1" version with numeric lock and adding machine feature (split spacebar with large "0" key).

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IBM 3727 Operator Console Keyboard

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

The 87-key keyboard for the IBM 3725 Communication Controller's 3727 Operator Console.

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IBM 3276/3278/3279 Display Station 87-key Typewriter Keyboard w/ Number Pad & Tab Key

TheMK#1822 (donated photo)

RPQ 8K0932

eg, P/N 1745709

IBM-made 87-key [data] typewriter keyboard for IBM 3276 Control Unit Display Station, 3278 Display Station and 3279 Color Display Station. This RPQ 8K0732 variant was intended for US English market and notably has a number pad and tab key instead of "PFxx" or attribute select keys and has a numeric lock.

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Model F keyboards

IBM 5322 System/23 Datamaster Keyboard Assembly

M. Wichary (CC-BY-2.0)

eg, P/Ns 1643374, 1643377, 1643380, 1643383, 1643395, 1860765, 1860768, 1860771, 1860777, 1860783

IBM-made 83-key integrated keyboard assembly for the IBM System/23 Datamaster (IBM 5322 "desk-top" variant). This keyboard assembly is presently the earliest confirmed Model F keyboard design and buckling spring keyboard at large. The layout is derived from that of the IBM 5251/5252 Typewriter Keyboard but makes minor tweaks to establish the true XT-style physical layout.

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IBM Personal Computer Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

aka, "Model F/XT"

eg, P/Ns 1501100, 1501101, 1501102, 1501104, 1501105, 1801449

IBM-made 83-key keyboard for the IBM 5150 Personal Computer and 5160 Personal Computer XT. It's famous for being the original IBM PC keyboard and is also the earliest known discrete Model F keyboard (ie, not integrated into a larger system) and introduced the XT-style functional layout. It has a black, coiled cable terminating in a 5-pin DIN plug, single-setting riser feet accessible from the sides, and 4 cork feet to prevent sliding. Two variants exist; a Type 1 keyboard with a metal-jacketed DIN plug that supports a RESET line and a Type 2 keyboard with a plastic-jacketed DIN plug that doesn't.

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IBM Electronic Typewriter Model 65/85/95 Keyboard Assembly

zrrion (donated photo)

eg, P/Ns 1305676, 1305677, 1305679, 1305687, 1415880, 1437057

55-key integrated keyboard assembly with rocker switches and LED panel for the IBM Electronic Typewriter models 65, 85 and 95 series.

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IBM 5324 System/23 Datamaster Floortop Keyboard Module

C. Hurlbut (permission requested and given)

eg, P/N 8529401

IBM-made 83-key discrete keyboard for the IBM System/23 Datamaster (IBM 5324 "floor-top" variant). This version of the Datamaster and this keyboard were announced later than its 5322 integrated counterparts. The keyboard resembles the slightly earlier IBM 5291/5292 Display Station Keyboard with its large bezels (compared to the IBM Personal Computer Keyboard) but is larger still and only has one adjustable riser feet size. The layout is derived from that of the IBM 5251/5252 Typewriter Keyboard but makes minor tweaks to establish the true XT-style physical layout.

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IBM 5291/5292 Display Station Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 1397950, 4176191, 5642852, 5643009, 5643010, 5643011, 5643012, 5643014, 5643024, 7363290

IBM or Lexmark made 83-key typewriter-style keyboard for the IBM 5291 Display Station and IBM 5292 Color Display Station, both IBM 5250-compatible terminals. The keyboard resembles the IBM 5150/5160 Personal Computer Keyboard but with enlarged bezels and its characteristic three-setting riser-style feet. This earned it the community nickname "bigfoot" Model F. The keyboard also lacks its own controller and thus doesn't produce its own scancodes (the electronics inside only allow for capacitance sensing for the host terminal to control itself). The keyboard was available in two variants that were identical apart from the cable; a Type 1 keyboard for IBM 5291 Model 1s with an integrated connection via a 14-pin IDC-style connector and a Type 2 keyboard for 5291 Model 2s with an external connection via a DA-15 plug.

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IBM System 9001 Standard Keyboard

Engicoder (public domain)

aka, IBM Instruments Computer System 9000 Keyboard

eg, P/N 4780898

IBM-made 83-key keyboard for the original IBM Instruments Computer System 9000 laboratory computer model (later known as the IBM System 9001 Bench-Top Computer). It's a variant of the IBM Personal Computer Keyboard that lacks any sort of adjustable feet and has its cable sprouting from the keyboard's lefthand side instead of its rear. It has a black, coiled cable terminating in a 5-pin DIN plug and 4 cork feet to prevent sliding. The "Standard" in the keyboard's name contrasts it with the later IBM System 9002 Hybrid Keyboard.

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IBM 4704 Display Station Model 100 Function Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, "Model F50"

eg, P/Ns 6019273, 6019312, 6019315, 6019316, 6019317, 6019318

IBM-made 50-key bank teller keyboard for IBM 4704 Model 1, 2 and 3 Display Terminals, components of the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System. This keyboard layout is divided into 3 matrix sections that were originally facilitating 45 customisable (relegendable) keys and 5 fixed-function keys. The keyboard was envisioned to allow basic data entry, account management and transaction management. The keyboard's cover is made of zinc and has a volume-adjustable buzzer on the bottom intended to provide an audible alarm to the user on certain system and application program conditions.

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IBM 4704 Display Station Model 200 Alphameric Keyboard

webwit (public domain)

Aka, "Model F62" or "kishsaver"

eg, P/Ns 6019284, 6019319, 6019324, 6019326, 6019328, 6019329, 6019334, 6019337

IBM-made 62-key typewriter-style keyboard for IBM 4704 Model 1, 2 and 3 Display Terminals, components of the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System. The keyboard is a particularly early example of a 60% keyboard and was designed to allow for full alphanumeric input capability but limited programmed-function capability compared to the 50-key IBM 4704-100 Function Keyboard. As such, the host terminals allowed a Model 100 keyboard and this Model 200 keyboard to be combined to provide both functionalities effectively. The keyboard on its own was intended for personal consultants and administrative personnel. The keyboard's cover is made of zinc and has a volume-adjustable buzzer on the bottom intended to provide an audible alarm to the user on certain system and application program conditions.

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IBM 4704 Display Station Model 300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard

Ellipse @ modelfkeyboards.com (permission requested and given)

Aka, "Model F77"

eg, P/Ns 6019303, 6019338, 6019343, 6019345, 6019347, 6019348, 6019353, 6019356

IBM-made 77-key typewriter-style keyboard for IBM 4704 Model 1, 2 and 3 Display Terminals, components of the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System. This keyboard is an expanded version of the 62-key IBM 4704-200 Alphameric Keyboard with 15 extra relegendable keys for tailored alphabetic input or programmed functions. Like its smaller sibling, this keyboard was intended for personal consultants and administrative personnel. The keyboard's cover is made of zinc and has a volume-adjustable buzzer on the bottom intended to provide an audible alarm to the user on certain system and application program conditions.

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IBM 3104-B1/3178-C1 Data Entry Keyboard

webwit (public domain)

eg, P/N 5640991

75-key (rest of world) or 76-key (Japanese) data entry keyboard for the 3270-family IBM 3104 Model B1 Display Terminal and IBM 3178 Model C1 Display Station. It was a part of the continuation of IBM 3270 Base Keyboards that originated in the IBM Model B keyboard family era. It has an internal solenoid clicker assembly and a blue-coloured display case toggle switch.

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IBM 3104-B2/3178-C2 Typewriter Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 4742702, 4742704, 5640987

87-key (rest of world) or 88-key (Japanese) typewriter-style EBCDIC keyboard for the 3270-family IBM 3104 Model B2 Display Terminal and IBM 3178 Model C2 Display Station. It was a part of the continuation of IBM 3270 Base Keyboards that originated in the IBM Model B keyboard family era. It has an internal solenoid clicker assembly and a blue-coloured display case toggle switch. This keyboard has a 12-key program-function keypad with only PF13 to PF24 legends.

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IBM 3178-C3 Typewriter Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 6052101

87-key typewriter-style EBCDIC keyboard for the 3270-family IBM 3178 Model C3 Display Station. It was a part of the continuation of IBM 3270 Base Keyboards that originated in the IBM Model B keyboard family era, specifically implementing the RPQ 8K1038 327X-87 type Model B Base Keyboard's layout originally for [at least] IBM 3278 Model 2 Display Stations. This layout was notable for its 12-key combination adding machine style numeric keypad with 24 program-function legends. It has an internal solenoid clicker assembly and a blue-coloured display case toggle switch. It was only available in US English.

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IBM 4980 Display Station Typewriter Keyboard

Wazrach (permission to use given)

eg, P/N 4178208

IBM-made 127-key typewriter keyboard for the IBM 4980 Display Station, a terminal for IBM Series/1 minicomputers that was functionally similar to the earlier IBM 4978 Display Station. It was the first "battleship"-sized Model F (Converged Keyboard) to make it to market. Its 24-key function key bank has "PFxx" nomenclature legends with PF1 to PF12 keys arranged as the top row instead of the typical bottom row. It's also notable for having several relegendable keys and a "00" key in its numeric keypad area, split and stepped right shift key, a 1.25-unit return key and a 1-unit backspace key.

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IBM 4704 Display Station Model 400 Administrative Keyboard

Ellipse @ modelfkeyboards.com (permission requested and given)

Aka, "Model F107"

eg, P/Ns 6020218, 6020219, 6020223, 6020225, 6020227, 6020228, 6020233, 6020236

IBM-made 107-key typewriter-style keyboard for IBM 4704 Model 2 and 3 Display Terminals, components of the IBM 4700 Finance Communication System. This keyboard is the largest of all IBM 4704 keyboards and is essentially a further expanded version of the 62-key IBM 4704-200 Alphameric Keyboard and 77-key IBM 4704-300 Expanded Alphameric Keyboard with 45 and 30 extra keys respectively. All but two of the extra keys are relegendable keys for tailored alphabetic input or programmed functions - the remainder ("Attn" and "Clear") are predefined control keys. The keyboard was intended for administrative personnel. The keyboard's cover is made of zinc and has a volume-adjustable buzzer on the bottom intended to provide an audible alarm to the user on certain system and application program conditions.

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IBM 3270 Personal Computer Converged Keyboard

aka, IBM 5271 Personal Computer Converged Keyboard

eg, P/Ns 1385096, 1445095, 1445097, 1445098, 1445099, 6110344

IBM-made 122-key terminal emulator style keyboard intended for use with the IBM 3270 Personal Computer (type 5271, IBM PC/XT with 3270 emulation features). Its 24-key function key bank has "PFxx" nomenclature legends.

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IBM 3178-C4 Typewriter Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 6052141

87-key typewriter-style EBCDIC keyboard for the 3270-family IBM 3178 Model C4 Display Station. It was a part of the continuation of IBM 3270 Base Keyboards that originated in the IBM Model B keyboard family era, specifically implementing the RPQ 8K0932 327X-87 type Model B Base Keyboard's layout originally for IBM 3276, 3278 and 3279 Display Stations. This layout was notable for its 12-key combination adding machine style numeric keypad with 12 program-function legends. It has an internal solenoid clicker assembly and a blue-coloured display case toggle switch. It was only available in US English.

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IBM 5080 Graphics System Alphanumeric Keyboard

Ellipse @ modelfkeyboards.com (permission requested and given)

eg, P/Ns 6016730, 6248412

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IBM 3180 Model 1 Display Station Typewriter Keyboard Element

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N 6110345

IBM-made 122-key typewriter-style keyboard intended for use with the IBM 3270 compatible IBM 3180 Model 1 Display Station. Its 24-key function key bank has "PFxx" nomenclature legends.

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IBM 3180 Model 2 Display Station Typewriter Keyboard Element

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 6110347, 6111079, 6111082, 6111085, 6111087, 6111088, 6111092

IBM-made 122-key typewriter-style keyboard intended for use with the IBM 5250 compatible IBM 3180 Model 2 Display Station. Its 24-key function key bank typically has "Cmdxx" nomenclature legends but "Fxx" legends have also been spotted.

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IBM 3205 Color Display Console Keyboard Unit

jugostran (donated photo)

eg, P/Ns 1385082, 1385490, 1385492, 1385494, 1385495, 1385497, 1385498, 1385499, 1385503, 1385504

IBM-made 122-key (most) or 124-key (Japanese Katakana) operator console keyboard for the IBM 3270 lineage IBM 3205 Color Display Console, a console for the System/370 compatible IBM 4361 and 4381 Processors. The keyboard notably had a green "START" key and a yellow "STOP" key. Its 24-key function key bank has "PFxx" nomenclature legends.

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IBM System 9002 Hybrid Keyboard

IBM-made 140-key (83 buckling spring, 57 touch) keyboard for the IBM System 9002 Desk-Top Computer for laboratories. It's a counterpart to the IBM System 9001 Standard Keyboard that integrates the same basic IBM Personal Computer Keyboard derived assembly design with a functional keypad (membrane touch panel) that for the aforementioned System 9001 was a component integrated into the computer itself. The "Hybrid" in the keyboard's name represents this merging of technologies. The keyboard's outer design is similar to 104-key IBM Converged Keyboards and appears to feature side-accessible riser feet. Not much else is known about this keyboard.

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IBM Portable Personal Computer Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 6111235, 6450304, 8654422, 8654428, 8654430, 8654431, 8654432

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IBM Personal Computer AT Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

aka, "Model F/AT"

eg, P/Ns 1503092, 6450200, 6450221, 6450222, 6450223, 6450225, 8286165

IBM-made 84-key keyboard for the IBM 5170 Personal Computer AT. It was the official successor to the original IBM Personal Computer Keyboard and introduced the AT-style physical and function layouts. It has a black, coiled cable terminating in a 5-pin DIN plug and single-setting riser feet accessible from the sides. It was one of the last new Model F keyboard variants to be introduced.

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IBM 3101/7485 ASCII Display Terminal Keyboard

daedalus (permission requested and given)

eg, P/N 8323237

IBM-made 87-key ASCII keyboard for the IBM 3101 ASCII Display Terminal and IBM 7485 Display Station (which itself was an RPQ variant of 3101). This keyboard was a low-profile replacement for the original IBM Model B based IBM 3101 ASCII Display Terminal Keyboard that started shipping with 3101 and 7485 orders after 17th August 1984. The keyboard itself is based on the IBM 3104/3178 Typewriter Base Keyboard (31XX-87 type Model F) design but lacks its blue case-toggle switch and now features many DIP switches under a door above the keys.

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IBM 3179 Color Graphics Display Station Typewriter Keyboard

theMK (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1385151

IBM-made 122-key typewriter-style keyboard intended for use with the IBM 3270 compatible IBM 3179 Model G1 Color Graphics Display Station. Its 24-key function key bank has "PFxx" nomenclature legends.

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IBM TPC Keyboard III

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N 1385072

IBM-made 122-key terminal emulator style keyboard intended for use with the IBM 4456 TEMPEST PC III (aka, TPC III or TPC3), a TEMPESTed version of the IBM 3270 Personal Computer. This keyboard is based on the IBM 5271 Personal Computer Converged Keyboard but has a slightly altered layout (the backspace key is now 1-unit and the left shift key is now ANSI-style), a different connector (DE-9 instead of 240-degree 5-pin DIN plug) and internal shielding around its controller electronics. Its 24-key function key bank has "PFxx" nomenclature legends.

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IBM TPC Keyboard IV

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N 4010504

TEMPESTed version of the IBM PC/AT Keyboard for IBM 4459 TPC IV.

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Model M keyboards

IBM Wheelwriter 5 Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1351000

IBM self-made keyboard assembly for the IBM Wheelwriter 5 electronic typewriter, presently the earliest Model M-type keyboard known.

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IBM 3179 Model 1 Color Display Station Typewriter Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1389152

"Battleship" style 122-key Model M intended for use with IBM 3270 compatible IBM 3179 Model 1 Color Display Stations.

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IBM 7531/7532 Industrial Computer Keyboard

photo donated via email

w/ IBM black square badge

eg, P/Ns 1388032, 1388044, 1388072, 1388076

IBM-made 101-key (ANSI) or 102-key (ISO) Enhanced Industrial Keyboard for the IBM 7531 and 7532 Industrial Computers. It came with an SDL to AT-style 5-pin DIN plug cable and was the first IBM Enhanced Keyboard variant to make it to market.

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IBM 3161 ASCII Display Station Keyboard

P. Zwettler (All Rites Reversed)

eg, P/N 1386303

IBM-made 102-key (ANSI) or 103-key (ISO) terminal Enhanced Keyboard for IBM 3161 ASCII Display Station. It had a permanently-attached coiled cable terminating in a 240-degree 5-pin DIN plug and was in fact the first of such Enhanced-based terminal keyboards.

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IBM 6770/6780 System Movable Keyboard

Recycled Goods, Inc. (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N 1351218

86-key movable keyboard unit with 80-character LCD for the IBM 6770 Wheelwriter System and 6780 Quietwriter System and their Function Pack 20 (System/20) and Function Pack 40 (System/40) variants.

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IBM 468X POS Alphanumeric Keyboard

taylorswiftttttt (permission requested and given)

eg, P/Ns 76X0035, 76X0036, 76X0037, 76X0039, 76X0043, 76X0044, 76X0045

84-key point-of-sale keyboard for IBM 4683 and 4684 POS Terminals with PC/AT-style layout.

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IBM Personal Computer AT Enhanced Keyboard

Brandon @ ClickyKeyboards (photo used with attribution)

eg, P/Ns 1390131, 1390132, 1390133, 1390134, 1390135, 1390136

IBM-made 101-key (ANSI) or 102-key (ISO) Enhanced Keyboard intended for IBM Personal Computer ATs and compatibles. Despite being for PC/AT, it's controller card has auto-sensing capability that allows it to operate with PC/XTs with compatible BIOSes as well.

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IBM Personal Computer XT Enhanced Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 1389969, 1390120, 1390146, 1390148, 1390150

IBM-made 101-key (ANSI) or 102-key (ISO) Enhanced Keyboard intended for IBM Personal Computer XTs with a compatible BIOS. Despite being for PC/XT, it's controller card has auto-sensing capability that allows it to operate with PC/ATs as well. Due to its intended PC/XT compatibility, it lacks LED lock-lights.

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IBM 3163/3164 ASCII Display Station ALA Keyboard

Sandy55 (use with attribution)

eg, P/N 1390680

IBM-made 102-key terminal Enhanced Keyboard for IBM 3163 and 3164 ASCII Display Station models 860 and 861. It's a variant of the DIN plug based terminal Enhanced Keyboard with 24 F-key legends across 12 physical keys and numerous diacritics keys to support American Library Association (ALA) character entry.

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IBM 3197 Color Display Station Typewriter Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 1390876, 1390881, 1390886, 1390888

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IBM PC/3270 Host Connected Enhanced Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

w/ IBM grey oval badge

eg, P/N 1391580

IBM-made 101-key PS/2 Enhanced Keyboard variant with IBM 3270 terminal style sublegends.

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IBM Airline Reservation System Keyboard

Brandon @ ClickyKeyboards (permission requested and given)

w/ IBM grey oval badge

eg, P/N 1393464

IBM-made 101-key PS/2 Enhanced Keyboard variant with unique keycaps for airline reservation software. This keyboard has been associated with Delta Airlines, Sabre Corporation, and United Airlines.

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IBM 3151 ASCII Display Station Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

w/ IBM grey oval badge

eg, P/N 1392595

IBM-made or Lexmark-made 102-key (ANSI) or 103-key (ISO) terminal Enhanced Keyboard for IBM 3151 ASCII Display Station. It had a permanently-attached coiled cable terminating in a modular 8P5C (RJ-45/ethernet-like) plug and was in fact the first of such Enhanced-based terminal keyboards.

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IBM Personal System/2 Enhanced Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

w/ IBM grey oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1391401, 1391402, 1391403, 1391404, 1391405, 1391406, 1391413, 1391506

IBM-made 101-key (ANSI), 102-key (ISO) or 104-key (ABNT) Enhanced Keyboard intended for IBM Personal System/2s and compatibles. They're considered to be the most common type of Model M keyboard.

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IBM 3151 ASCII Display Station Space Saving Keyboard

Ellipse @ modelfkeyboards.com (permission requested and given)

eg, P/N 1392980

The earliest variant of IBM Space Saving Keyboard pictured.

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IBM PC/3270 Host Connected Converged Keyboard

raoulduke-esq (donated photo)

eg, P/N 1393656

IBM-made 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) Converged Keyboard for IBM PC/AT and PS/2 systems running IBM Personal Communications/3270 software. It's unique amongst Type 1 122-key Model Ms for having a cable terminating in a PS/2 (6-pin Mini-DIN) plug. Its 24-key function key bank has "PFxx" nomenclature legends.

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IBM Screen Reader Keypad

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1393387

The peripheral component of the IBM Screen Reader series, the first GUI-based screen reader designed to help people with hard or lack of sight access a PC.

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IBM InfoWindow Coax Display Station Keyboard

Jugostran#2852 (donated photo)

eg, P/Ns 1394099, 1394114, 1394119, 1394124

"Battlecruiser" style 122-key Model M intended for use with IBM 3270 (hence "coax") compatible IBM InfoWindow and InfoWindow II Display Stations.

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IBM InfoWindow Twinax Display Station Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 1394167, 1394312, 1394317, 1394320, 1394324, 1395660

"Battlecruiser" style 122-key Model M intended for use with IBM 5250 (hence "twinax") compatible IBM InfoWindow and InfoWindow II Display Stations.

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IBM 754x/756x/GEARBOX 800 Industrial Computer Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

w/ IBM black oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1394946, 1394956, 1394958, 1394959, 1394964, 1394965, 1394968, 1394971

IBM-made or Lexmark-made 101-key (ANSI) or 102-key (ISO) Enhanced Industrial Keyboard for the IBM 7541, 7542, 7561 and 7562 Industrial Computers and IBM GEARBOX 800 Industrial Computers. It came with an SDL to PS/2 cable.

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IBM InfoWindow Coax Display Station Enhanced Keyboard

Jugostran#2852 (donated photo)

w/ IBM grey oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1394204, 1394223, 1394229

IBM-made or Lexmark-made 102-key (ANSI) or 103-key (ISO) terminal Enhanced Keyboard for IBM 3270 (coaxial cable) compatible IBM InfoWindow and InfoWindow II Display Stations. It's a variant of the modular 8P5C terminal Enhanced Keyboard with 24 F-key legends across 12 physical keys, 3270-centric legends and elongated flip-out feet.

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IBM 50-key Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, IBM Model 100 Functional Keypad Emulator

eg, P/N 1392560

Designed for IBM 4700 Personal Computer or similar usage, mimicking and emulating the earlier IBM 4704 Display Station Model 100 Functional Keypad. This version is relegendable.

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IBM 50-key Keyboard

Unicomp (used under fair dealing)

Aka, IBM Model 100 Functional Keypad Emulator

eg, P/N 1395249

Designed for IBM 4700 Personal Computer or similar usage, mimicking and emulating the earlier IBM 4704 Display Station Model 100 Functional Keypad. This version has alphanumeric legends.

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IBM Personal System/2 Host Connected Keyboard

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

w/ IBM grey oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1396900, 1396901, 1396908, 1396910, 1396911, 1396990, 1397000, 1397003

IBM-made 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) keyboard for IBM PS/2 and later PCs that were eligible for the IBM Select-A-Keyboard scheme. It was originally intended for IBM PCs running IBM Personal Communications/3270 Version 2.0 or IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program Entry Level 2.0 software. These had a modular SDL to PS/2 cable.

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IBM 7785 Industrial Space Saving Keyboard

P. Zwettler (All Rites Reversed)

eg, P/N 1395682

Variant of the IBM Space Saving Keyboard made specifically for the IBM 7785 Service Bay Systems used by Mopar.

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IBM Numeric Keypad for IBM PS/2 L40SX

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 1396199, 1396571, 1396572, 1396573, 1396574

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IBM InfoWindow Coax Display Station Enhanced Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

w/ IBM blue oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1394204, 1394223, 1394229

IBM-made or Lexmark-made 102-key (ANSI) or 103-key (ISO) terminal Enhanced Keyboard for IBM 3270 (coaxial cable) compatible IBM InfoWindow and InfoWindow II Display Stations. It's a variant of the modular 8P5C terminal Enhanced Keyboard with 24 F-key legends across 12 physical keys, 3270-centric legends and elongated flip-out feet.

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IBM Personal System/2 Enhanced Keyboard

Brandon @ ClickyKeyboards.com

w/ IBM blue oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1391401, 1391402, 1391403, 1391404, 1391405, 1391406, 1391413, 1391506

IBM-made 101-key (ANSI), 102-key (ISO) or 104-key (ABNT) Enhanced Keyboard intended for IBM Personal System/2s and compatibles. They're considered to be the most common type of Model M keyboard.

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Lexmark Spacesaver Keyboard

elecplus (permission requested and given)

eg, P/N 1397961

Lexmark own-brand version of the IBM Space Saving Keyboard.

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IBM PC/3270 Host Connected Enhanced Keyboard

Unicomp (used under fair dealing)

w/ IBM blue oval badge

eg, P/N 1391580

IBM-made or Lexmark-made 101-key PS/2 Enhanced Keyboard variant with IBM 3270 terminal style sublegends.

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IBM Personal System/2 Host Connected Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

w/ IBM blue oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1396900, 1396901, 1396908, 1396910, 1396911, 1396990, 1397000, 1397003

IBM or Lexmark made 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) keyboard for IBM PS/2 and later PCs that were eligible for the IBM Select-A-Keyboard scheme. It was originally intended for IBM PCs running IBM Personal Communications/3270 Version 2.0 or IBM PC 3270 Emulation Program Entry Level 2.0 software. These had a modular SDL to PS/2 cable.

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IBM 3153 InfoWindow II Color ASCII Display Station Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 42H0468, 42H0469, 42H0470, 8133896, 8133897, 8133900, 8133901, 8133902

An ASCII-style IBM 3153 (3101-compatible) terminal Model M2.

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IBM PS/2 CL57SX Keyboard Assembly

laptop.pics (donated photo)

eg, P/Ns 1397800, 1397861, 1397862, 1397925, 1397928, 1397929

IBM U.S.-made 84-key (ANSI) or 85-key (ISO) keyboard assembly for the IBM 8554 Personal System/2 CL57SX, IBM's first western-market colour notebook laptop. Whilst the host laptop has a trackball present, it is a separate assembly that is not attached to the keyboard. It retained the same physical layout as the IBM Model M3 keyboard assembly (IBM PS/2 L40SX's) but now has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and (if present) an overlay numeric keypad with dull blue legends. Along with its Japanese-exclusive variant - the IBM 5527 PS/55note N27sx's keyboard assembly - the 8554 keyboard is currently tied for the earliest known IBM Model M6 family keyboard assembly.

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IBM PS/55note N27sx Keyboard Assembly

aucfree (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N 1398299

89-key keyboard assembly for the Japanese-exclusive IBM 5527 PS/55note N27sx portable computer, a variant of the IBM 8554 PS/2 CL57SX. Whilst the host laptop has a trackball present, it is a separate assembly that is not attached to the keyboard. It retains most of the CL57SX's layout but besides the added Japanese-centric keys, it has enlarged Ctrl and Enter keys, reduced right-side navigation key sizes, and several other key unit size reductions. It has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends. Along with the CL57SX keyboard, the N27sx keyboard is currently tied for the earliest known IBM Model M6 family keyboard assembly.

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Lexmark Notebook Keyboard with 16mm Trackball

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1399300

Lexmark-made 84-key keyboard assembly for their AR10 series of self-branded Lexbook and third-party-branded notebook laptops. Namely, this included at least the CompuAdd Express models 325FTX, 425CXL and 425FTX, Cube ProBook 425NTX, Hyundai Courier Spectra and the Lexmark Lexbook AR10 proper. It has an integrated 16mm trackball in the bottom-right corner and two mouse buttons placed in between the left Ctrl and Alt keys ("M1" and "M2"). It has an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends.

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IBM PS/note 182-series Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 33G4426, 33G4492, 33G6025, 33G6026, 33G6027, 33G6028, 33G6031, 33G9573

IBM U.S.-made 85-key (ANSI) and 86-key (ISO) keyboard assembly for the IBM 2141 PS/note 182 series entry-level notebook laptop. The 182 series included at least the 2141-182 proper, 2141-E82, 2141-M82, 2141-N82, 2141-S82 and 2141-W82. The 182 keyboard is amongst the few Model M6/M6-1 family keyboards without an integrated pointing device. It's visually based on the 84-key Lexmark Notebook Keyboard but with extra width and given arrow keys moved to a position correct for the classic ThinkPad physical layout. However, the 182 keyboard was notable for adding a function (Fn) key to this layout. It has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends.

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IBM PS/55note C52 Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 44G3620

Lexmark-made 89-key keyboard assembly for the Japanese-exclusive IBM 9552 PS/55note C52 notebook laptop, a variant of the IBM ThinkPad 700C. It has an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick and two mouse buttons. Whilst it largely inherits the IBM ThinkPad 700/720 series physical layout, the right Alt key is slightly shorter and the arrow keys were moved to in between the right Alt and Ctrl keys. It has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends.

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IBM ThinkPad 700-series & 720-series Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

standard raven black variant

eg, P/Ns 44G3618, 44G3795, 48G9230, 48G9231, 48G9235, 48G9237, 48G9239, 48G9246, 48G9249

Lexmark-made 84-key (ANSI) or 85-key (ISO) keyboard assembly for the IBM 9552 ThinkPad 700 series and 720 series notebook laptops. It has an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick and two mouse buttons. As the 9552 was the first IBM ThinkPad with a TrackPoint, this is considered to be the earliest 'true' ThinkPad keyboard and introduces the much-loved classic ThinkPad keyboard layout. It has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and an overlay numeric keypad with dull blue legends.

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CompuAdd Keyboard

Engicoder (use with attribution)

eg, P/Ns 1369167, 1397771

Lexmark-made 101-key (BAE-style enter key) or 102-key (ISO) Enhanced Keyboard variant branded for CompuAdd. This keyboard notably has an permanently-attached coiled cable terminating in an AT-style full-size 5-pin DIN plug.

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Dell Enhanced Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1397651

Lexmark-made 101-key Enhanced Keyboard variant branded for Dell. This version has their 'modern' rotated "E" style branding.

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ICPI Ambra Europe "1-series" Enhanced Keyboard

tamsin (donated photo)

eg, P/Ns AMB1001, AMB1003, AMB1006, AMB1007, AMB1018

IBM U.K.-made Enhanced Keyboard variant for IBM subsidiary ICPI's Ambra PCs, sporting unique blue-grey coloured casing (with the top piece lighter than the bottom), italic font keycaps, Ambra-specific oval badge and LED lock-light overlay with circular view holes. Can come with either a permanently attached PS/2 cable or a modular 6-pin SDL to PS/2 cable.

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ICPI Ambra Europe "2-series" Enhanced Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N AMB2001

IBM U.K.-made Enhanced Keyboard variant for IBM subsidiary ICPI's Ambra PCs, sporting a unique Ambra-specific oval badge and LED lock-light overlay with circular view holes but lacking the blue-grey casing, unique keycaps and occasional possibility of modular (SDL-based) cables Ambra "1-series" Enhanced Keyboards have.

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ICPI Ambra North America Enhanced Keyboard

eBay (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/Ns 1378160, 1378162

Lexmark U.S.-made Enhanced Keyboard variant for IBM subsidiary ICPI's Ambra PCs, sporting a unique isosceles trapezium shaped badge but lacking all other unique customisations found on its IBM U.K. made "1-series" and "2-series" counterparts.

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IBM Trackball Keyboard

Sandy55 (reuse permitted with attribution)

Aka, IBM Enhanced Keyboard with 16mm Trackball

eg, P/N 1370478

Variant of the IBM Enhanced Keyboard with 16mm trackball placed above the arrow keys.

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Lexmark Classic Touch Keyboard with Integrated 25mm Trackball

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 1398150, 1399912

Variant of the Lexmark Classic Touch Keyboard with 25mm trackball placed in the top-right corner.

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IBM 101-Key Keyboard with 25mm Trackball - PS Style

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, IBM Enhanced Keyboard with 25mm Trackball

eg, P/Ns 59G7982, 92G7455

Variant of the IBM Enhanced Keyboard with 25mm trackball placed in the top-right corner.

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IBM ThinkPad 350-series & PS/note 425-series Keyboard Assembly

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/Ns 59G7569, 60G1653, 60G1753, 60G1793, 60G1794, 60G1795, 60G1796, 60G1797, 60G1798, 60G1799

Lexmark-made 85-key (ANSI) or 85-key (ISO) keyboard assembly for the IBM 2618 ThinkPad 350-series and PS/note 425-series notebook laptops. It is directly derived from the IBM PS/note 182-series Keyboard Assembly but adds an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick and two mouse buttons to the design. It has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends.

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IBM ThinkPad 500-series Keyboard Assembly

Jack @ laptop.pics (donated photo)

eg, P/N 59G7920

81-key keyboard assembly for the IBM 2603 ThinkPad 500 subnotebook laptop. It has an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick but its two buttons are not a part of the keyboard itself. The 2603 keyboard is presently the earliest known Model M6-1 keyboard assembly and manages to fit almost all the keys of a winkeyless tenkeyless keyboard into a footprint smaller than any classic-style ThinkPad keyboard. It has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends.

🔗

IBM Retail POS Keyboard with Card Reader

IBM (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/Ns 41J7248, 92F6320

Multiple-OEM 50-key point-of-sale keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe reader in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family and replacement to the earlier IBM 4680 series 50-Key Modifiable Layout Keyboard. These were used with IBM 4690 series and SurePOS series POS terminals. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and storm grey (bottom cover piece) version that used an RS485 serial interface via a modular 8-pin SDL to 8-pin SDL cable. Earlier versions were typically made by Lexmark or Maxi Switch and generally used dye-sublimated legends for the Ctrl and numeric keypad keys, whereas later versions were typically made by XAC or XSZ and used lasered legends instead.

🔗

IBM Retail POS Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/Ns 41J7247, 92F6310

Multiple-OEM 50-key point-of-sale keyboard without integrated magnetic stripe reader in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family and replacement to the earlier IBM 4680 series 50-Key Modifiable Layout Keyboard. These were used with IBM 4690 series and SurePOS series POS terminals. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and storm grey (bottom cover piece) version that used an RS485 serial interface via a modular 8-pin SDL to 8-pin SDL cable. Earlier versions were typically made by Lexmark or Maxi Switch and generally used dye-sublimated legends for the Ctrl and numeric keypad keys, whereas later versions were typically made by XAC or XSZ and used lasered legends instead.

🔗

IBM Retail POS Keyboard with Card Reader and Display

IBM (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/Ns 41J7250, 92F6330

Multiple-OEM 50-key point-of-sale keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe reader and tilt-adjustable 2x20 LCD in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family and replacement to the earlier IBM 4680 series 50-Key Modifiable Layout Keyboard and Operator Display. These were used with IBM 4690 series and SurePOS series POS terminals. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and storm grey (bottom cover piece) version that used an RS485 serial interface via a modular 8-pin SDL to 8-pin SDL cable. Earlier versions were typically made by Lexmark or Maxi Switch and generally used dye-sublimated legends for the Ctrl and numeric keypad keys, whereas later versions were typically made by XAC or XSZ and used lasered legends instead.

🔗

IBM Retail ANPOS Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

Aka, IBM RANPOS or NANPOS Keyboard

eg, P/Ns 92F6271, 92F6272, 92F6273, 92F6275, 92F6278

Multiple-OEM 116 (US English) or 117 (rest of world) key alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe reader in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family and replacement to the earlier IBM 4680 series ANPOS Keyboard. These were used with IBM 4690 series and SurePOS series POS terminals. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and storm grey (bottom cover piece) version that used an RS485 serial interface via a modular 8-pin SDL to 8-pin SDL cable. Earlier versions were typically made by Lexmark or Maxi Switch and generally used dye-sublimated legends for non-relegendable keys, whereas later versions were typically made by XAC or XSZ and used lasered legends instead.

🔗

IBM Modifiable Layout Keyboard

IBM (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/Ns 41J8019, 92F6290

Multiple-OEM 133-key matrix-style keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe reader in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family and replacement to the earlier IBM 4680 series Matrix Keyboard. These were used with IBM 4690 series and SurePOS series POS terminals. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and storm grey (bottom cover piece) version that used an RS485 serial interface via a modular 8-pin SDL to 8-pin SDL cable. Earlier versions were typically made by Lexmark or Maxi Switch and generally used dye-sublimated legends for the Ctrl and numeric keypad keys, whereas later versions were typically made by XAC or XSZ and used lasered legends instead.

🔗

IBM ThinkPad 750-series Keyboard Assembly

Catawiki (used under fair dealing)

grey variant

eg, P/N 66G0152

Lexmark-made 86-key keyboard assembly for the grey versions of IBM 9545 ThinkPad 750 series notebook laptops, which were known to be sold in France and Germany. It has an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick with two mouse buttons that were distinct for being thin and entirely red. The keyboard is the same as any other 9545 keyboard despite being grey. As such, its layout was still based on the ThinkPad 700, 720 and PS/55note C52 design but with an added function ("Fn") key. The keyboard assembly is also a hinged module that can be lifted to provide access to the host laptop's components. It has light grey modifier, lock and utility key legends and overlay numeric keypad legends.

🔗

IBM ThinkPad 750-series, 755C-series & 370C Keyboard Assembly

eBay (used under fair dealing)

standard raven black variant

eg, P/Ns 39H4027, 66G0120, 66G0121, 66G0126, 66G0154, 66G0159, 66G0163, 66G0165, 66G0168, 66G0169, 66G0171, 66G6402

Lexmark or Key Tronic made 85-key (ANSI), 86-key (ISO) or 90-key (JIS) keyboard assembly originally for the IBM 9545 ThinkPad 750 series and later reused for the IBM 9545 ThinkPad 755C and 755Cs, and IBM 9545 ThinkPad 370C notebook laptops. It has an integrated TrackPoint II pointing stick with two mouse buttons that were distinct for being thin and entirely red. The 9545 keyboard's layout is based on the ThinkPad 700, 720 and PS/55note C52 design but with an added function ("Fn") key and the Japanese version likewise has its arrow keys moved to in between the right Alt and Ctrl keys. The keyboard assembly is also now a hinged module that can be lifted to provide access to the host laptop's components. It has golden modifier, lock and utility key legends and an overlay numeric keypad with dull blue legends. The 9545 keyboard design is the same as the later IBM ThinkPad 355-series & 360 series Keyboard Assembly.

🔗

IBM Basic Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, IBM Enhanced Keyboard with Quiet Touch

eg, P/Ns 71G4624, 71G4625, 71G4630, 71G4638, 71G4643, 71G4644, 71G4647

Lexmark-made 101-key (ANSI), 102-key (ISO) or 104-key (ABNT) Enhanced Keyboard variant with Quiet Touch rubber dome key-switches.

🔗

Lexmark Notebook Keyboard with Integrated Mouse Key

Jack @ laptop.pics (donated photo)

MB10/MB15 variant

76-key keyboard assembly for the Lexmark Lexbook MB10 and MB15 DOS subnotebook laptops. It has an integrated "mouse-key" in the bottom-right corner that acts as a joystick-like pointing device and two mouse buttons placed in between the left Ctrl and Alt keys. Its physical layout is derived from the IBM ThinkPad 500-series Keyboard Assembly but makes fewer layout compromises at the expense of fewer total keys. It has an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends.

🔗

Lexmark Classic Touch Keyboard with Integrated Pointing Stick

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1403380

Lexmark-branded Model M13 keyboard with FSR pointing stick and AT and DE-9 plugs.

🔗

IBM Wheelwriter 3500 Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1399135

Lexmark-made keyboard assembly for the IBM Wheelwriter 3500 electronic typewriter.

🔗

IBM Enhanced Keyboard with Soft Touch

Brandon @ ClickyKeyboards (permission requested and given)

eg, P/N 8184692

Lexmark-made 101-key Enhanced Keyboard with a speaker inside for IBM RISC System/6000s (but still PS/2 compatible). This version came with greased buckling springs from the factory.

🔗

Better On-line Solutions Host Connected Keyboard

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N 1369969

Lexmark-made 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) keyboard for Better On-Line Solutions (BOS), presumably for PC/AT and PS/2 compatible computers running IBM 5250 compatible terminal emulation software. Like IBM PS/2 Host Connected Keyboards, this one has various blue sublegends to differentiate PC-only functions from terminal/universal ones. These had a modular SDL to PS/2 cable.

🔗

Tadpole SPARCbook 3-series Keyboard Assembly

oldcomputer.info (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Made by Lexmark or Key Tronic for Tadpole, based on the IBM RS/6000 N40 Keyboard Assembly.

🔗

Winbook XP series Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1403740

Made for Winbook by Lexmark and sports an FSR pointing stick.

🔗

IBM TrackPoint II Keyboard (Black)

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 13H6705

Lexmark or Maxi Switch OEM OPTIONS by IBM branded Model M13 in raven black with TrackPoint II pointing stick.

🔗

IBM Adjustable Keyboard

webwit (public domain)

eg, P/N 13H6689

IBM-branded Model M15 split-ergonomic keyboard based on the Model M1/M2 design, shares same part number as OPTIONS by IBM variant.

🔗

IBM Adjustable Keyboard

webwit (public domain)

eg, P/N 13H6689

OPTIONS by IBM branded Model M15 split-ergonomic keyboard based on the Model M1/M2 design, shares same part number as the simple IBM branded variant.

🔗

IBM Adjustable Keyboard Numeric Keypad Option

webwit (public domain)

eg, P/N 1403599

Numeric keypad option for IBM Adjustable Keyboards or Lexmark Select-Ease Keyboards, likewise based on the Model M1/M2 design.

🔗

Lexmark Notebook Keyboard with Integrated Mouse Key

Higher Intellect Vintage Computing Wiki (used under fair dealing)

SE10 variant

78-key keyboard assembly for the Lexmark Lexbook SE10 subnotebook laptop, a 'sister-laptop' to the IBM ThinkPad 500-series. It has an integrated "mouse-key" in the bottom-right corner that acts as a joystick-like pointing device and two mouse buttons placed in between the left Ctrl and Alt keys. Giving its relation to the ThinkPad 500, the SE10 keyboard's physical layout is derived from the 500's but makes fewer layout compromises at the expense of fewer total keys. It has an overlay numeric keypad with vibrant blue legends.

🔗

IBM Japanese Keyboard/TrackPoint II

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model 5576-C01

eg, P/Ns 66G8362, 66G8363

A Japanese-exclusive Model M13 derivative intended for "Green PC" and "PC Stream" IBM Personal System/55E systems.

🔗

IBM ThinkPad 355-series/360-series Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 84G5728, 84G5897, 84G5898, 84G5900, 84G5902, 84G5905, 84G5911, 84G5914, 84G5915, 84G5916

Keyboard assembly for IBM 2619 ThinkPad 355 and 2620 ThinkPad 360 series with TrackPoint II pointing stick, made by Lexmark for IBM.

🔗

AST Ascentia 900N-series Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 232010-001, 232010-004, 232011-001

Made for AST by Lexmark, can sport either TrackPoint II or FSR pointing stick.

🔗

IBM Personal System/2 Enhanced Keyboard

Daniel Beardsmore (public domain)

w/ IBM blue oval badge

eg, P/Ns 1391402, 1391403, 1391404, 1391406, 42H1292, 42H1295

IBM UK-made or Lexmark-made 101-key (ANSI), 102-key (ISO) or 104-key (ABNT) Enhanced Keyboard intended for IBM Personal System/2s and compatibles. This version has a pressure-fitted controller card instead of the old-style controller card with Triomate membrane flex cable sockets and a permanently-attached non-coiled PS/2 cable.

🔗

Bull DPX/20 Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 1399240

Lexmark-made 101-key Enhanced Keyboard with a speaker inside for IBM RISC System/6000s (but still PS/2 compatible). This version shipped with rebranded IBM RS/6000 workstations for French company Groupe Bull, with the keyboards likewise having unique branding but also a greyer than usual LED lock-light overlay.

🔗

Lexmark Host Connected Keyboard

T. Pershing (donated photos)

eg, P/N 1369986

Lexmark-made and self-branded 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) keyboard presumably for PC/AT and PS/2 compatible computers running IBM 3270 compatible terminal emulation software. Like IBM PS/2 Host Connected Keyboards, this one has various blue sublegends to differentiate (most) PC-only functions from terminal/universal ones, but this also has several green sublegends including for some PC-only functions. These had a modular SDL to PS/2 cable.

🔗

Lexmark Streamlined Keyboard

eBay (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N 1398419

A Lexmark-branded PC-style terminal Model M2 with an unusually short cable.

🔗

IBM Enhanced Keyboard with TrackPoint II

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 92G7461

Lexmark or Maxi Switch OEM OPTIONS by IBM branded Model M13 in pearl white with TrackPoint II pointing stick.

🔗

IBM Enhanced Industrial Keyboard with TrackPoint II

HellGalaxy (donated photo)

Lexmark & Maxi Switch made variant

eg, P/N 06H4173

Lexmark or Maxi Switch made 101-key (ANSI only) Enhanced Industrial Keyboard with pointing stick for IBM 7585, 7587 (Model 1) and 7588 Industrial Computers. This is the original version with a strain gauge TrackPoint II pointing stick and an IBM black oval badge with raised silver text. The keyboard is supposed to have a permanently attached Y-split PS/2 cable.

🔗

Lexmark Select-Ease Keyboard

webwit (public domain)

eg, P/N 1428401

Lexmark-branded Model M15 split-ergonomic keyboard based on the Model M1/M2 design.

🔗

IBM Space Saver Keyboard with TrackPoint II

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Lexmark-made raven black variant

eg, P/N 84G6294

Lexmark OEM raven black Model M4-1.

🔗

IBM Space Saver Keyboard with TrackPoint II

Brandon @ ClickyKeyboards (used under fair dealing)

Key Tronic-made pearl white variant

eg, P/N 84H8470

Key Tronic OEM pearl white Model M4-1.

🔗

Unicomp 5250 Terminal for Decision Data

fabs0#4240 (photo used under request)

eg, P/Ns A218291, A218331

Unicomp-made "battlecruiser" style 122-key Model M intended for use with Decision Data Computer Corporation's 5250-compatible terminals. They uniquely have a red text "ALICE" key at the top-right position of the numeric keypad used for accessing the Alice productivity suite.

🔗

IBM Enhanced Industrial Keyboard with TrackPoint II

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Unicomp-made variant

eg, P/N 06H4173

Unicomp-made 101-key (ANSI only) Enhanced Industrial Keyboard with pointing stick for IBM 7585, 7587 (Model 1) and 7588 Industrial Computers. This is the revised version with an FSR 'Lexmark-Unicomp' pointing stick (despite the "TrackPoint II" name holdover from [the original version](directory?id=gNKi0XTc) of the keyboard) and a flat IBM blue oval badge. The keyboard is supposed to have a permanently attached Y-split PS/2 cable.

🔗

IBM Space Saver Keyboard with TrackPoint II

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Unicomp-made raven black variant

eg, P/N 84G2524

Unicomp OEM raven black Model M4-1.

🔗

Galactech SmarTrex Network System Telecommunications Keyboard

Brandon @ ClickyKeyboards (permission requested and given)

eg, P/N GALII11

Raven black 101-key Unicomp Customizer variant made for Galactech with custom keycaps, telephone cradle and phone jack supporting a plain old telephone system (POTS) analogue passthrough.

🔗

Unicomp Kentucky Wildcats Keyboard

foone (permission requested and given)

eg, P/N UNIKYKB

Pearl white 101-key Unicomp Customizer variant sold with blue and white Kentucky Wildcats themed keycaps, unique badge style and lock-light LED overlay.

🔗

IBM InfoWindow Coax Display Station Enhanced Keyboard

jugostran (donated photo)

w/ IBM logo across lock-light LEDs area blanking plate

eg, P/Ns 1394204, 1394223, 1394229

Unicomp-made 102-key (ANSI) or 103-key (ISO) terminal Enhanced Keyboard for IBM 3270 (coaxial cable) compatible IBM InfoWindow and InfoWindow II Display Stations. It's a variant of the modular 8P5C terminal Enhanced Keyboard with 24 F-key legends across 12 physical keys and 3270-centric legends, however, this 'late' Unicomp-made version lacks the elongated flip-out feet its IBM-made and Lexmark-made predecessors had.

🔗

IBM Personal System/2 Enhanced Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

w/ IBM logo across lock-light LEDs overlay

eg, P/N 42H1292

Unicomp-made 101-key (ANSI), 102-key (ISO) or 104-key (ABNT) Enhanced Keyboard intended for IBM Personal System/2s and compatibles. This version has a pressure-fitted controller card instead of the old-style controller card with Triomate membrane flex cable sockets and a permanently-attached non-coiled PS/2 cable, but also uses different top cover piece tooling with branding relocated.

🔗

Unicomp On-The-Ball Plus

Unicomp (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/Ns UNI0496, UNI2496

A unique hybrid of the Unicomps On-The-Stick and On-The-Ball keyboard designs with FSR pointing stick and 25mm trackball in the top-right.

🔗

IBM USB Retail ANPOS Keyboard with MSR

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, IBM USB RANPOS or USB NANPOS Keyboard

eg, P/Ns 86H1059, 86H1066, 86H1074, 86H1075

Multiple-OEM 116 (US English) or 117 (rest of world) key alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe reader in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family and replacement to the earlier IBM 4680 series ANPOS Keyboard. These were used with IBM SurePOS series terminals. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and storm grey (bottom cover piece) version that used an USB interface via a 4-pin IDC to Type-A USB or 12V PoweredUSB cable. Earlier versions were typically made by Maxi Switch and generally used dye-sublimated legends for non-relegendable keys, whereas later versions were typically made by XAC or XSZ and used lasered legends instead.

🔗

General Electric Marquette Keyboard

Brandon @ ClickyKeyboards (permission requested and given)

eg, P/Ns 2045802-001, 2045802-002, UNZ3416, UNZ4416

101-key (ANSI) or 102-key (ISO) Unicomp Customizer variant made for General Electric Marquette with many notable unique keycap suited for their CardioLab and Mac-Lab products.

🔗

IBM SurePoint 4820 Monitor Keypad and MSR Extension

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 40N6377

Iron grey 32-key monitor-mounted keypad with magnetic stripe reader for the IBM 4820 SurePoint Touch Display and member of the IBM pre-Modular POS family.

🔗

Unicomp EnduraPro

Unicomp (used under fair dealing)

Pearl white w/ original bottom row

The original pearl white EnduraPro.

🔗

Unicomp 3270 Emulator 122 for Development Concepts, Inc.

theMK (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N DCI0852

Unicomp-made 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) keyboard for Development Concepts, Inc. It's presently unclear what PCs or thin client computers these were used with or what software they ran, but the keyboard has an IBM 3270-style layout and appears to be identical to the original IBM PS/2 Host Connected Keyboard. These however had no visible branding and had a permanently attached but coiled PS/2 cable.

🔗

IBM PS/2 ANPOS Keyboard with Integrated Pointing Device

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 13G2130

XAC or XSZ made 116 (US English) or 117 (rest of world) key alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe in the IBM Pre-Modular POS keyboard family and variant of the IBM Model M9 RANPOS Keyboard that adds a pointing device to the design. These were used with IBM SurePOS series terminals. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and litho grey (bottom cover piece) version that used a PS/2 interface via a modular 8-pin SDL to dual PS/2 cable.

🔗

IBM CANPOS Keyboard

doomsday_device (donated photo)

eg, P/N 54P8785

XAC-made 133 (US English), 134 (EMEA) or 136 (Brazil) key compact alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard in the IBM Pre-Modular POS keyboard family and derived from the IBM Model M9 RANPOS Keyboard. The design fits a full-size keyboard worth of keys, 32 programmable keys and an integrated pointing device into a tenkeyless-like width. This variant does not have a magnetic stripe reader (a blanking plate is present instead).

🔗

IBM CANPOS Keyboard with Card Reader

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 44D1860

XAC-made 133 (US English), 134 (EMEA) or 136 (Brazil) key compact alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard in the IBM Pre-Modular POS keyboard family and derived from the IBM Model M9 RANPOS Keyboard. The design fits a full-size keyboard worth of keys, 32 programmable keys and an integrated pointing device into a tenkeyless-like width. This variant has a magnetic stripe reader.

🔗

Unicomp Customizer

WorthPoint (used under fair dealing)

eg, P/N UB20416

Raven black Unicomp Customizer variant with white-on-black keycaps sold only for a relatively short time.

🔗

Unicomp EnduraPro

Crizender#8942 (donated photo)

Raven black case & keycaps w/ original bottom row

eg, P/N UB204G6

Raven black EnduraPro with white-on-black keycaps sold only for a relatively short time.

🔗

IBM 3494 Track Pointer Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 18P7970, 18P7970, 18P7972, 18P7973, 18P7973

Very late Unicomp OEM IBM-branded Model M13 in pearl white with FSR pointing stick intended for IBM TotalStorage 3494 Enterprise Automated Tape Libraries.

🔗

IBM Retail POS Keyboard with Card Reader

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 41J7243

XSZ-made 50-key point-of-sale keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe reader in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family and replacement to the earlier IBM 4680 series 50-Key Modifiable Layout Keyboard. These were used with IBM SurePOS series terminals. This is the iron grey version that used an USB interface via a 4-pin IDC to Type-A USB or 12V PoweredUSB cable. These exclusively used pad-printed legends for its Ctrl and numeric keypad keys compared to its earlier pearl white/grey counterpart.

🔗

IBM 4613 SurePOS 100 Express System Keyboard Assembly

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 44D4035

96-key matrix-style integrated keyboard assembly with integrated magnetic stripe reader for the IBM 4613 SurePOS 100 Express System. It's a part of the IBM Pre-Modular POS keyboard family. The keyboard doesn't have its own controller, instead requiring its host system to drive the keyboard and its card reader. The keyboard has two membrane flex cables for key-matrix connections.

🔗

IBM Modular ANPOS II Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, IBM MANPOS Keyboard

eg, P/N 93Y1223

XSZ-made 116 (US English) or 117 (rest of world) key alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard in the IBM Modular POS (MPOS) keyboard family and successor to the IBM Models M9 RANPOS and M-e PS/2 ANPOS Keyboards. These were used with IBM SurePOS series terminals. This is the pearl white version. The key lock, magnetic stripe reader, and pointing device components are modular and subject to various configurations, so many MANPOS keyboards may not appear to be the same.

🔗

IBM Modular CANPOS II Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, IBM MCANPOS Keyboard

eg, P/Ns 93Y1231, 93Y1232, 93Y1233

XSZ-made 133 (US English) or 134 (rest of world) key compact alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard in the IBM Modular POS (MPOS) keyboard family and successor to the original IBM CANPOS Keyboard. Like its predecessor, this keyboard compacts a full-size keyboard with 32 programmable keys into a tenkeyless-like width. The key lock, magnetic stripe reader, and pointing device components are modular and subject to various configurations, so many MCANPOS keyboards may not appear to be the same.

🔗

IBM Modular 67-Key POS Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 65Y4045, 65Y4047

XSZ-made 67-key point-of-sale keyboard in the IBM Modular POS (MPOS) keyboard family and successor to the IBM Model M7 and Model M7-1 50-Key RPOS Keyboards. These were used with IBM SurePOS series terminals. This is the iron grey version. The key lock and magnetic stripe reader components are modular and subject to various configurations, so many 67-key MPOS keyboards may not appear to be the same.

🔗

Unicomp 5250 Emulator for NLynx Technologies

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N DD43T56

Unicomp-made 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) keyboard for NLynx Technologies and their various 5250-compatible connectivity products. These have a raven black cover set, a permanently attached PS/2 cable, and no branding.

🔗

IBM Modular 67-Key Keyboard with LCD Display

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 7431184

XSZ-made 67-key point-of-sale keyboard with tilt-adjustable 2x20 LCD in the IBM Modular POS (MPOS) keyboard family and successor to the IBM Model M8 50-Key RPOS LCD Keyboard. These were used with IBM SurePOS series terminals. This is the iron grey version. The key lock and magnetic stripe reader components are modular and subject to various configurations, so many 67-key MPOS LCD keyboards may not appear to be the same.

🔗

IBM Modular 67-Key Keyboard with LCD Display

TheMK (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 65Y4044

XSZ-made 67-key point-of-sale keyboard with tilt-adjustable 2x20 LCD in the IBM Modular POS (MPOS) keyboard family and successor to the IBM Model M8 50-Key RPOS LCD Keyboard. These were used with IBM SurePOS series terminals. This is the pearl white version. The key lock and magnetic stripe reader components are modular and subject to various configurations, so many 67-key MPOS LCD keyboards may not appear to be the same.

🔗

Toshiba POS System Keyboard with Card Reader

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 7431818

Toshiba TEC-made continuation of the IBM-era 50-key point-of-sale keyboard with integrated magnetic stripe reader in the IBM Retail POS (RPOS) keyboard family, now made for Toshiba Global Commerce Solutions. These were used as FRUs and for TGCS-rebranded IBM SurePOS terminals. Its design is for the most part unaltered compared to the last IBM-era Model M7s but with any IBM branding patched from its cover set tooling. This is the pearl white (top cover piece) and storm grey (bottom cover piece) version that used an RS485 serial interface via a modular 8-pin SDL to 8-pin SDL cable. It exclusively used lasered legends for its Ctrl and numeric keypad keys.

🔗

General Electric Healthcare Mac-Lab/CardioLab Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 2054858-001, 2054858-002, 2054858-003

Raven black 101-key (ANSI) or 102-key (ISO) Unicomp Classic variant made for General Electric Healthcare with many notable unique keycap suited for their CardioLab and Mac-Lab products.

🔗

Unicomp EnduraPro

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Raven black case only w/ revised bottom row

eg, P/Ns UB404G6, UB43PJA

Raven black version of the EnduraPro with post-2013 bottom row keycaps.

🔗

Unicomp Ultra Classic

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 00UA41P4A, UN4KPHA, UNI0P46, UNI0P4A

Pearl white version of the Ultra Classic with post-2013 bottom row keycaps.

🔗

Unicomp Ultra Classic

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns UB40P36, UB40P3A, UB40P46, UB40P4A, UB43PHA, UE4UPHA

Raven black version of the Ultra Classic with post-2013 bottom row keycaps.

🔗

Toshiba Modular ANPOS Keyboard

NewEgg (used under fair dealing)

Aka, Toshiba MANPOS Keyboard

eg, P/Ns 00DN181, 3AA01195500, 3AA01198500, 3AA01198600, 3AA01198700, 3AA01198800, 3AA01198900, 3AA01199000, 3AA01199100

Toshiba TEC-made 116 (US English) or 117 (rest of world) key alphanumeric point-of-sale keyboard in the IBM Modular POS (MPOS) keyboard family and successor to the IBM Models M9 RANPOS and M-e PS/2 ANPOS Keyboards, now made for Toshiba Global Commerce Solutions. These were used with Toshiba TCx series POS terminals. Its design is for the most part unaltered compared to the last IBM-era MANPOS Keyboards but with any IBM branding removed from its cover set. This is the iron grey version. The key lock, magnetic stripe reader, and pointing device components are modular and subject to various configurations, so many MANPOS keyboards may not appear to be the same.

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Unicomp PC 122 5250 Terminal Emulator

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N UB40T56

Unicomp-made and self-branded 122-key host-connected (terminal emulator) keyboard for PC and IBM 5250 emulation software usage. These have a raven black cover set, a permanently attached PS/2 cable, and Unicomp logo across lock-light LEDs overlay branding.

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Unicomp New Model M

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns UB40U4A, UB43U5A, UT40U4A

103-key ("Tsangan"-style ANSI), 104-key (ANSI) or 105-key (ISO) full-size keyboard designed as a replacement for various Unicomp keyboards that were still being made with aged tooling. It's only available with a raven black coloured cover set. It's unique compared to the old Unicomp Classic in that it had reduced bezel size and matched the side profile of IBM Space Saving Keyboards instead of IBM Enhanced Keyboards. Upon release, it was the first truly new official buckling spring keyboard design in ~20 years.

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Unicomp Mini Model M

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns UB40E7A, UT40E7A, UT43EHA

87-key (ANSI) or 88-key (ISO) tenkeyless keyboard designed as the long-awaited successor to the IBM Space Saving Keyboard. It's only available with a raven black coloured cover set. Compared to its spiritual predecessor, this has slightly thinner left and side key-to-edge bezels, added lock-light LEDs and added GUI keys. Compared to all previous buckling spring Model M keyboard variants, this has a newly designed key-matrix that allows for more keys to be pressable with each across the alphabetic area. It also has an entirely new controller card design (compared to any previous Unicomp keyboard) with a lockable USB socket that supports a modular Type-A to Type-A USB cable.

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Lighted program function keyboards

IBM MICRO CADAM Lighted Program Function Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 79F1028

Japanese-only LPFK with kanji/katakana overlay intended for use with MICRO CADAM software.

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Alps, Brother & Ricoh made East Asia keyboards

IBM Japanese Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model 5576-A01

eg, P/N 79F0167

A Japanese-exclusive keyboard made by Brother for IBM that notably features modular buckling spring modules.

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Rubber dome TrackPoint keyboards

IBM TrackPoint IV Keyboard

Model KPD8923

eg, P/Ns 01K1220, 01K1260

Chicony KB-5923 derivative and IBM's first TrackPoint IV desktop keyboard.

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IBM Space Saver II

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model RT3200

eg, P/Ns 28L3644, 28L3645, 28L3647, 28L3648, 28L3649, 28L3650, 28L3652, 37L0905

IBM's first TrackPoint keyboard with three mouse buttons, made by NMB for IBM.

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IBM TrackPoint USB Space Saver Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model KPH0035

eg, P/Ns 22P5150, 22P5151, 22P5152, 22P5155, 22P5156, 22P5157, 22P5158, 22P5163, 24P0349

USB version of the NetVista-era TrackPoint IV tenkeyless keyboard, made by Chicony for IBM.

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Classic ThinkPad-style keyboards

IBM USB Keyboard with UltraNav

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model SK-8835

eg, P/Ns 02R0424, 31P8950, 31P8951, 31P8952, 31P8953, 31P8954, 31P8959, 31P8960, 31P8963, 31P8977

LITE-ON made 104-key (ANSI), 105-key (ISO) or 109-key (JIS) full-size ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is IBM branded and has a numeric keypad, full UltraNav pointing capability (Synaptics TouckStyk and TouchPad), USB connectivity and two-port USB hub.

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IBM USB Travel Keyboard with UltraNav

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model SK-8845

eg, P/Ns 31P9490, 31P9491, 31P9492, 31P9493, 31P9494, 31P9500, 31P9503, 31P9504, 31P9514, 31P9515, 31P9517

LITE-ON made 85-key (ANSI), 86-key (ISO) or 89-key (JIS) tenkeyless ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is IBM branded, doesn't have a numeric keypad, and has full UltraNav pointing capability (Synaptics TouckStyk and TouchPad), USB connectivity, short USB cable and two-port USB hub. It's also known as IBM USB Travel Keyboard Option.

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IBM PS/2 Travel Keyboard with UltraNav

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model SK-8840

eg, P/Ns 89P8500, 89P8503, 89P8507, 89P8508, 89P8509, 89P8513, 89P8514, 89P8516, 89P8519, 89P8522, 89P8527

LITE-ON made 85-key (ANSI), 86-key (ISO) or 89-key (JIS) tenkeyless ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is IBM branded, doesn't have a numeric keypad, and has full UltraNav pointing capability (Synaptics TouckStyk and TouchPad) and PS/2 connectivity. It's also known as IBM 1U Monitor Console Keyboard, IBM PS/2 Travel Keyboard or IBM Keyboard with Integrated Pointing Device PS/2.

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Lenovo UltraNav Fullsize USB Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model SK-8835

eg, P/Ns 41A5091, 41A5092, 41A5094, 41A5098, 41A5099, 41A5139, 41A5140, 41A5144, 41A5145, 41A5147, 41A5150, 41A5153, 41A5158, 41A5159

LITE-ON made 104-key (ANSI), 105-key (ISO) or 109-key (JIS) full-size ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is "ThinkPad" (Lenovo-style) branded and has a numeric keypad, full UltraNav pointing capability (Synaptics TouckStyk and TouchPad), USB connectivity and two-port USB hub. It's also known as Lenovo ThinkPad Full-Size UltraNav USB Keyboard.

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IBM UltraNav USB Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model SK-8845RC

eg, P/Ns 40K5373, 40K5375, 40K5379, 40K5380, 40K5381, 40K9414, 94Y6179, 94Y6186, 94Y6187, 94Y6188, 94Y6192

LITE-ON made 85-key (ANSI), 86-key (ISO) or 89-key (JIS) tenkeyless ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is IBM branded, doesn't have a numeric keypad, and has full UltraNav pointing capability (Synaptics TouckStyk and TouchPad), USB connectivity, long USB cable and two-port USB hub. It's also known as IBM Keyboard with Integrated Pointing Device USB.

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IBM Keyboard with Integrated Pointing Device USB

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model SK-8845CR

eg, P/Ns 00WV000, 01LK250, 46W6713, 46W6715, 46W6719, 46W6720, 46W6721, 46W6725, 46W6726, 46W6728, 46W6731, 46W6734, 46W6739

LITE-ON made 85-key (ANSI), 86-key (ISO) or 89-key (JIS) tenkeyless ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is IBM branded, doesn't have a numeric keypad, and has pointing stick capability only (Synaptics TouckStyk), USB connectivity, long USB cable and two-port USB hub.

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Lenovo UltraNav Keyboard USB

dhgate.com (used under fair dealing)

Model SK-8845CR, w/ old-style logo

eg, P/Ns 00MV946, 00MW310

LITE-ON made 85-key (ANSI), 86-key (ISO) or 89-key (JIS) tenkeyless ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is Lenovo branded (old-style logo), doesn't have a numeric keypad, and has pointing stick capability only (Synaptics TouckStyk), USB connectivity, long USB cable and two-port USB hub.

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Lenovo UltraNav Keyboard USB

eBay (used under fair dealing)

Model SK-8845CR, w/ new-style logo

eg, P/N 00MV970

LITE-ON made 85-key (ANSI), 86-key (ISO) or 89-key (JIS) tenkeyless ThinkPad-style keyboard. This variant is Lenovo branded (new-style logo), doesn't have a numeric keypad, and has pointing stick capability only (Synaptics TouckStyk), USB connectivity, long USB cable and two-port USB hub.

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AccuType & Precision style keyboards

Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2 Bluetooth Keyboard with Stand

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model EBK-209A

eg, P/Ns 0B47270, 0B47272, 0B47273, 0B47277, 0B47278, 0B47279, 0B47283, 0B47287, 0B47294, 0B47358, 0B47362, 0B47363

Bluetooth keyboard with Optical TrackPoint and stand accessory for the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2, made by Sunrex Technology for Lenovo.

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Lenovo ThinkPad Compact USB Keyboard with TrackPoint

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model KU-1255

eg, P/Ns 03X8720, 03X8725, 03X8726, 03X8727, 03X8732, 03X8733, 03X8735, 03X8737, 03X8741, 03X8749, 03X8750, 0B47190, 0B47221

Desktop Precision-style ThinkPad USB keyboard with TrackPoint IV, made by Chicony for Lenovo.

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Lenovo ThinkPad Multi Connect Bluetooth Keyboard

AliExpress (used under fair dealing)

Model KT-1525

eg, P/N 4X30K12182

Desktop Precision-style ThinkPad Bluetooth keyboard with TrackPoint IV, made by Chicony for Lenovo. It's capable of connecting to multiple devices at once and is believed to be a Chinese exclusive.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Thin Keyboard

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model TP00082K1, w/ black bottom cover

eg, P/Ns 01HX701, 01HX704, 01HX711, 01HX730, 01HX738, SM10M94000, SM10M94002, SM10M94003, SM10M94005, SM10M94012, SM10M94017, SM10M94022, SM10M94029, SM10M94031, SM10M94032, SM10M94033

Primax Electronics made 83-key (ANSI), 84-key (ISO) or 88-key (JIS) Precision-style portfolio keyboard intended for the Lenovo 20GG/20GH ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 1. It magnetically attaches to its host device and connects via a 6-pin Pogo-based USB interface. It has an UltraNav consisting of a TrackPoint IV pointing stick and a standard trackpad. It also has backlighting. This is the black bottom cover version.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Thin Keyboard

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model TP00082K1, w/ silver bottom cover

eg, P/Ns 01HX801, 01HX802, 01HX803, 01HX804, 01HX805, 01HX810, 01HX811, 01HX812, 01HX817, 01HX822, 01HX830, 01HX831, 01HX832, 01HX833, 01HX838, SM10M94100, SM10M94129

Primax Electronics made 83-key (ANSI), 84-key (ISO) or 88-key (JIS) Precision-style portfolio keyboard intended for the Lenovo 20GG/20GH ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 1. It magnetically attaches to its host device and connects via a 6-pin Pogo-based USB interface. It has an UltraNav consisting of a TrackPoint IV pointing stick and a standard trackpad. It also has backlighting. This is the silver bottom cover version.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Thin Keyboard

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model TP00082K1, w/ red bottom cover

eg, P/Ns 01HX751, 01HX752, 01HX753, 01HX754, 01HX755, 01HX760, 01HX767, 01HX772, 01HX779, 01HX780, 01HX781, 01HX782, 01HX783, 01HX788, SM10M94050, SM10M94061, SM10M94062

Primax Electronics made 83-key (ANSI), 84-key (ISO) or 88-key (JIS) Precision-style portfolio keyboard intended for the Lenovo 20GG/20GH ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 1. It magnetically attaches to its host device and connects via a 6-pin Pogo-based USB interface. It has an UltraNav consisting of a TrackPoint IV pointing stick and a standard trackpad. It also has backlighting. This is the red bottom cover version.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Thin Keyboard Gen 2

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model TP00082K3

Primax Electronics made 83-key (ANSI), 84-key (ISO) or 88-key (JIS) Precision-style portfolio keyboard intended for the Lenovo 20JB/20JC ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2. It magnetically attaches to its host device and connects via a 6-pin Pogo-based USB interface. It has an UltraNav consisting of a TrackPoint IV pointing stick and a standard trackpad. It also has backlighting and a fabric hoop for holding a digital pen.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 3 Thin Keyboard

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model TP00089K1

eg, P/Ns 02HL150, 02HL151, 02HL152, 02HL153, 02HL154, 02HL155, 02HL159, 02HL160, 02HL161, 02HL166, 02HL168, 02HL174, 02HL175, 02HL176, 02HL177, 02HL178, 02HL183

Chicony-made 84-key (ANSI), 85-key (ISO) or 89-key (JIS) Precision-style portfolio keyboard intended for the Lenovo 20KJ/20KK ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 3. It magnetically attaches to its host device and connects via a 6-pin Pogo-based USB interface. It has an UltraNav consisting of a TrackPoint IV pointing stick and a standard trackpad. It also has backlighting.

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Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model KC-1957

eg, P/Ns 4Y40X49493, 4Y40X49499, 4Y40X49500, 4Y40X49501, 4Y40X49505, 4Y40X49506, 4Y40X49507, 4Y40X49512, 4Y40X49514, 4Y40X49520, 4Y40X49522, 4Y40X49526

Second generation Precision-style ThinkPad wireless keyboard with TrackPoint IV, made by Chicony for Lenovo. It's capable of communicating via Bluetooth or 2.4GHz wireless via a dongle.

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Lenovo Fold Mini Keyboard

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model TK008

eg, P/Ns 4Y41B60251, 5N20Z32884, 5N20Z32885, 5N20Z32886, 5N20Z32887, 5N20Z32888, 5N20Z32889, 5N20Z77423, 5N20Z77424, 5N20Z77425

DongGuan Mae Tay Electronic Co. made 71-key (US English) or 73-key (rest of world) AccuType-style Bluetooth keyboard intended for the Lenovo 20RK/20RL ThinkPad X1 Fold Gen 1 foldable computer. It magnetically attaches to its host device and can be wirelessly charged when folded inside said device, but it can also be charged via Micro-B USB. It has an integrated trackpad and a fabric hoop for holding a digital pen such as the Lenovo Mod Pen or Lenovo Pen Pro.

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NEC VersaPro Cover Keyboard

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model PC-VP-KB45

eg, P/N SM11A32837AB

88-key Japanese-exclusive portfolio keyboard intended for the NEC VersaPro J series of Windows tablet PCs. NEC has a recent history of selling modified Lenovo ThinkPads with NEC branding and some NEC-specific features, and in this case, this keyboard is based on the Lenovo ThinkPad X12 Detachable Folio Keyboard but lacks a TrackPoint pointing stick and the AccuType-style keycaps. It magnetically attaches to its host device and connects via an 8-pin Pogo-based USB interface. It has a standard trackpad, backlighting, an integrated fingerprint reader and a fabric hoop for holding a digital pen. It's presently unclear what company made this keyboard.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X12 Detachable Folio Keyboard

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model X12 Folio

eg, P/Ns 5M11A36985, SM11A32838AB, SM11A32839AB, SM11A32843AB, SM11A32846AB, SM11A32848AB, SM11A32849AB, SM11A32850AB, SM11A32851AB, SM11A32856AB, SM11A32857AB, SM11A32858AB, SM11A32859AB, SM11A32860AB, SM11A32863AB, SM11A32866AB, SM11A32869AB, SM11A32873AB

83-key (ANSI), 84-key (ISO) or 88-key (JIS) Precision-style portfolio keyboard intended for the Lenovo 20UV/20UW ThinkPad X12 Detachable Gen 1. It was intended as a spiritual successor to the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet series and its keyboards (models TP00082K1, TP00082K3 and TP00089K1). It magnetically attaches to its host device and connects via an 8-pin Pogo-based USB interface. It has an UltraNav consisting of a TrackPoint IV pointing stick and a standard trackpad. It also has backlighting, an integrated fingerprint reader and a fabric hoop for holding a pen such as the Lenovo Precision Pen. It's presently unclear what company made this keyboard.

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Lenovo ThinkPad Bluetooth TrackPoint Keyboard and Stand

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model TKBBTDU811

eg, P/Ns 5N21J12538, 5N21J12541, 5N21J12545, 5N21J12546, 5N21J12547, 5N21J12552, 5N21J12554, 5N21J12560, SN21J12499, SN21J12525

Primax Electronics made 82-key (ANSI), 83-key (ISO) or 87-key (JIS) Precision-style Bluetooth keyboard intended for Lenovo 21ES/21ET ThinkPad X1 Fold 16 Gen 1 foldable computer. It magnetically attaches to its host device and is charged via Type-C USB. It has an UltraNav consisting of a TrackPoint IV pointing stick and Sensel haptic touchpad. It also has backlighting and an integrated fingerprint reader that is styled like a key.

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Lenovo Yoga Book 9 Bluetooth KB

Lenovo (used under fair dealing)

Model 8253B

eg, P/Ns 5CB1L69921, 5CB1L69922, 5CB1L69923, 5CB1L72106, 5CB1L72107, 5CB1L72109, 5CB1L72112, 5CB1L72114, 5CB1L72117, 5CB1L72119, 5CB1L72122, 5CB1L72124, 5CB1L72125, 5CB1L72127

Hefei-made 80-key (ANSI) or 81-key (ISO) AccuType-style Blutooth keyboard intended for the Lenovo 82YQ Yoga Book 9i (13IRU8) dual-screen laptop. It magnetically attaches to its host device and is charged via a Type-C USB port. It's also known as Lenovo Bluetooth Folio Keyboard.

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Presently miscellaneous or uncategorised

IBM 5531 Industrial Computer Keyboard Assembly

snuci (public domain)

eg, P/N 6421668

Oak-made 83-key keyboard for the IBM 5531 Industrial Computer, an industrialised version of the IBM 5160 Personal Computer XT. Despite its resemblance to the [IBM PC Keyboard](directory?id=CIAJw04U), it's not a Model F keyboard and can be distinguished by its flatter appearance and the lack of curvature on the separator between the F-keys and the rest of the keys. It has a black, coiled cable terminating in a 5-pin DIN plug, single-setting riser feet accessible from the sides, and 4 rubber feet to prevent sliding. This version has an IBM black square badge.

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IBM 468X POS Matrix Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 76X0100

139-key matrix-style keyboard for the IBM 4683 and 4684 POS Terminals, made by Key Tronic for IBM.

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IBM InfoWindow Coax Display Station Quiet Touch Data Entry Keyboard

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Aka, "domesaver"

eg, P/N 09F4231

"Unsaver" style 104-key data entry "Quiet Touch" terminal keyboard intended for use with IBM 3270 (hence "coax") compatible IBM InfoWindow Display Stations.

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IBM KeyPad III

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/Ns 79F1028, 79F6401, 95F5446, 95F5466, 95F6313, 95F6314, 95F6315, 95F6316

An Alps-made cigar box-style numeric keypad offered as an option for mid to late '90s IBM ThinkPads.

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IBM 5535-ZPP Numeric Keypad

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

eg, P/N 69H8533

A large numeric keypad designed for the Japanese-exclusive IBM PS/55 5535-ZPP portable computer.

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IBM Numeric Access II Keypad

Admiral Shark's Keyboards (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)

Model KU-9990

eg, P/N 09N5547

A slim laptop-style numeric keypad made by Chicony for IBM.

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